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Full text of "Meccano Magazine"











/ N 



THIS ISSUE 









Build a Training Brig 

Black Widow Plastic Feature 

Atom Bombs for Peace 

50 FREE Dinky Toys to be won 






First Time Ever— a Meccano Set with its own 6-Speed Power Unit 



Windmills, trains, cars, mixers, cranes.. .all the models you make 
with new Motonsed Meccano are motonsed! They work by 

themselves! 

Because the sensational new Motonsed Meccano Power Drive Set 
comes complete with its own source of power— a compact direct 
drive 6-speed gearbox, and really powerful electric motor that you 
build into every model you make! 



About the 6-Speed Power Unit— Super-efficient, sturdy and light, 
the motor unit works by 6-volt battery or 3-12 volt DC power 
supply. Speed range 115 r.p.m. to 2300 r.p.m. off-load at 6 volts. 

Fined with forward-off-reverse switch. 

Direct drive gearbox transmission rattos — 3 1 . 6:1 , 1 2 1 , 16:1, 32:1, 
60:1. Gears may be changed while motor is running. Foolproof. 
Simple to operate. No maintenance required. 



AT YOUR TOY SHOP NOW 

complete with easy-to-follow 
manual on new motonseti 

mode/making 

Meccano Lid Bmns Rd.. L .-rpool. 






OR 







UP 



AND 




/ 




FT, 






SPI 




/ 



PULL 



/ 



PUSH 



i 


















MECCANO STEAM ENGINE 



MECCANO 




RATIO GEARBOX 



MECCANO 




RATIO GEARBOX 



What a fabulous idea for Meccano WITH ELECTRIC MOTOR 



engineers to catch on to 



WITH UNIVERSAL COUPLING 



S ^^xr Now put 6-speed electric power into It's that terrific 6-speed gearbox 

again — this time with superbly de- 






eff.cient steam power to drive off your Meccano models! Really power- -^ .„ w . 

^ ea l S /^ a L nS ^!^? Ul L e _ V f ' W °[ kmg .u: ful sturdy and light, the motor works signed universal coupling that 

_ . . . . by 6-volt battery or 3-12 volt DC enables you \o drive it from any power 

Meccano Steam Engine has a single p0 wer supply. Speed range 11 5 r.p.m. source, using a standard Meccano 



methylated spirits and water, the 



lever that operates the fly-wheel in 



to 2300 r.p.m. off-load at 6 volts. 



forward and reverse directions, and Forward bff.Teverseswitch. rW/recf 



32 



diameterspindle. Ideal power units 



also controls the 

Clean, safe, simple to operate. 



Meccano EMEBO 



running speed. c j rjve gear b x transmission ratios are Electric Motors. 



ONLY 




3:1,6:1, 12:1,16:1,32:1,60:1. Gears 
may be changed while motor is 
running. Foolproof. Simple to operate. 

No maintenance required. 



ONLY 




and 



E15R 



ONLY 




at your toy shop now- in smart 'see-through' packs! 










COMPLETE WITH FULL INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE 



Meccano Ltd., Binns Rd. r Liverpool 



You 



9 




never 



seen 



onything 




realistic 




these 









-. 



FERRARI 250 
KIT PC101 

Spectacular show mode 

this famous GTO with new 



GTO/LM 

13/6 



o 



f 



scale. 



1964 Le Mans body, to 

Plastic parts in two colours, 



32 



including appropriate 



colour, 



c ear 



and 



body 



chrome 



finish. One-piece upper body 

(with mounting lugs for slot 
racing), one-piece underbody, 

thin clear windscreen, win- 
dows and headlight covers and 

detailed interiors. Real rubber 
tyres and racing decals in- 
cluded. 47 precision parts. 



AUTHENTIC SCALE 

CAR AND PLANE MODELS 

Over 100 fabulous models available 
Hot Rods to "Classics", Fighting 
Aircraft to Historical Aircraft and 

Military Vehicles. "Monogram" Car 

and Plane Kits are famous the world 

over for their accuracy of detai 

authenticity — actual colourings 

every part precision engineered. At 

prices ranging from 6/6d. to 153/6d. 



For full details of this exciting, con- 

stontty expanding range get the 32 
page "Monogram'' Catalogue. Price 1/~ 

from your Hobby, Mode! or Toy Shop 



or 




. post free direct from : 





SPITFIRE 

Superb 



PA79 1/48 SCALE 

fascinating working 



landing gear, complete 



cannon 



FROM ALL GOOD HOBBY, MODEL OR TOY SHOPS 





. A. HALES LTD., (Dept. C), 26 STATION CLOSE, POTTERS BAR, HERTS. Telephone: Potters Bar 52226 

A Member of the Lines Group 



I 































■ I 11 1 



P.1320 "SNOW HILL" GOODS TRAIN 

One of the most realistic electric train sets 

on the market, consisting of Electric Tank 
Locomotive, Open Goods Wagon, Drop- 
side Wagon 



tubes 



Ceme 



Wagon, Brake Van, Power Connector 
containers, and 8 Curved Rails and 2 
Straight Rails, altogether requiring 
a space of 27" x 334". 






Every model railway enthusiast knows about Playcraft 
Railways. Knows about their fabulous realism, their 
watch-like precision, their wonderfully low prices! 
And Playcraft give you in all 14 sets to choose from! 



All sets 



• 



accessories, 




P.831 Tank Loco Price 37/6 



rolling stock and rail 
still cost less than any 

other make! Build that 

big layout for a small 

outlay! 




P.631 Open Goods Wagon Price3/- 





P,838 0-4-0 Diesel Shunter Price 186 




r rr 





■I u 



- \\\ ' 



J' 
J 





P. 837 D.6100 Diesel Loco Price 52/- 



AVAILABLE AT ALL GOOD TOYSHOPS. STORES AND F. W. WOOLWORTH LTD. 














th 



finish which 



perfect 



t 



y 



dds 

mod 



th 



s, 





na! touch 

HUMBROL 




ENAMELS, matt or gloss are used by modell 

throughout the world 



Quick drying 




in a wide 



g 



of inter 



mixable colours, HUMBROL ENAMELS w 




meet 




ost exacting requirements 



They are available in the useful i oz. tinlet and 

sr sizes. Additions to this range are the 




n larg 



oz. 




16 oz, ae 



Now fitted with a 




NEW 'Soft Spray' head to give greater control 



in application. 

HUMBROL supply 



a 



complete range 



of 



modelling products including Britfix adhesives, 



dopes, varnishes and polyurethane gloss and 
satin finish in 4 oz, and 16 oz. aerosols— Look 



for them all at your nearest model shop. 



*N.B. HUMBROL ENAMELS are non-toxic 

absolutely safe for children's toys. 



? 




Look for the sign 

of the Humbrol 

paint locker 





Humbrol 



Hu 




England 














Editor J. D. McHard; Design R. S. Sodhl; K. I. Ramsay; 
Advertisement Manager A. 0. B. Johnson; Head Office 
Thomas Skinner & Co. (Publishers) Ltd., St. Alphage House, 
Fore Street, London, E.C2. Phone: NATiona! 4050. Grams: 

Desollar, London, E.C.2; New York Thomas Skinner & Co. 

(Publishers) Ltd., 111 Broadway, New York. New York 10006; 
Chicago Thomas Skinner 4. Co. (Publishers) Ltd., 35 East 
Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601; Los Angeles Duncan 
Scott & Marshall tnc>, 1830 W. 8th Street, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia 90057; San Francisco Duncan Scott & Marshall Inc., 

85 Post Street San Francisco, California 94104; Ottawa Suite 

35, 75 Sparks Street. Ottawa, Ontario. ^Meccano Limited 1966 




j*-. *m 




•i 



r . 



?i 




m 









m 



















March 1966 



Vol.51 - 



No. 




■ Monthly 



AEROMODELLING 



D 



RADIO 



D 



ELECTRONICS □ CAMPING 



n 



CYCLING 



□ 



STAMPS 



a 



FISHING 
















j. 



A" 







. 




+ + 

I ■ I »V\ LB- LlV r .fc 



■- ; ": 



L AA» J_" 





I fcr® 



■ 











■JM 



V 



4 4 § 




i fife : 




r ■ b x * ■ 



I t I 



■ 
- ■ I- ■ . 



fWI 



*.*_*. 



* _l 







Our four cover photographs by Geoffrey Simpson wiff 

certainly inspire you to build one of the seven powerboat 

variants of Project 66 on this month's free plan; Top left: 
Brave Moppie: Top right: Blue Marlln, Bottom left: 

Migrant, Bottom right: Vivacity. 





Contents 

Project 66 Phase 

The Big Blast 

Swing 

Tom Sheridan 

The Black Widow 

Make a Reporter 
Meccano Baggage Truck 
Transport in Hungary 

19th Century Training Brig 

Short Back and Sides 

Home on the Range 

The Number 7 Bus 
Fun and Games 
The Powerdrivers 

Tri-ang Hornby Bell Code 

Swing Bridge Mechanism 

Have You Seen? 
Dinky Toys Competition 

Stamps 




10 
12 

14 

16 

18 
20 

21 

22 

24 

26 
28 

30 

32 
34 

36 

37 

39 
41 



Ordering the Meccano Magazine Overseas Readers 

overseas can order the Meccano Magazine from 
Meccano dealers or direct from the publishers, or 
from the publishers' offices listed above. The subscrip- 
tion rate for 12 months is the equivalent of 20s. sterling 
atthe current rate of exchange, U.S.A. and Canada $3.00. 



In this age of space flight, intercontinental missiles, 
anti-missile missiles, rocket-launching submarines and 
supersonic airliners, it is sobering to stop and consider 
that a mere hundred years ago, our defence relied upon 
the wood and canvas sailing ships of the Royal Navy. 
These vessels spread our influence around the world 
and established a great empire. 

The fascination of that sub sub-sonic age of not so long 
ago increases as it recedes and becomes ever stranger 
to our present way of life. 

But the sailing ship is not yet dead. Many people 
believe it to be the only kind of craft in which a seaman 
can properly learn his trade, and sail training ships are 

therefore still to be seen along the shipping routes of 
the world. 

In the great days of sail, the Brig was often used for 

training and this month, on page 23, we are featuring a 
ine drawing of a typical vessel of this type. It's the 




first of a series that all sea-dogs, old and not-so-old, 
will want to collect. Ian Stair's story of the brig makes 



most interesting reading, and modellers will find there 
sufficient information and inspiration to get a brig onto 
their stocks right away. 

Binding. Meccano Magazine readers like to preserve 
their copies for future reference, and to this end, many 
of you buy our smart orange and black clip-in binders to 
store your issues as they arrive, then, at the end of the 

year have them permanently bound in a uniform style. 

We know of many long-time readers who have such 

unbroken sets dating back to the twenties ! 

If you would like to take advantage of this permanent 

binding service, pack your year's issues carefully and 



send 



them, together 



with 



correct remittance 



to 





Duncan Ltd, (Bookbinders), 20 Cumberland 



Street, Liverpool, 




The 



charge for binding 



the 



1964/65 volume is 18s. 6d. 1961, 1962 and 1963 
volumes cost 1 7s 6d to bind, and 1 960 is 1 4s 6d. 




e 




CTY~ 



Next Month: A special CYCLING NUMBER and the last part of Project 66, which 
will show you how to fit out your boat with radio control. 





■""pHE full size plan this month shows arc then joined b\ formers and the cabin this size would weaken the cabin sides 



1 the parte required to make SEVEN 

more models based on the same (Brave 

Moopie) hull — all well known high speed 



craft. 



These, together 



with 



Bra\e 



Moppie', make up a complete fleet of off- 
shore racers. You can build them all 

or, perhaps better still, get together with 

some other chaps and each of you build 

a different racer for trying out against 

each other on the local pond. 

Remember, the hull and fitting out 
details are exactly the same as described 
in Parts 1 and 2 for all the models, h is 



unit then cemented in place on the hull 

the after part of the sides coming over 

the deck beam position so as to leave the 
aft side decking intact. The exact posi- 
tion for fitting the sides can be deter- 
mined from the full size plan. 

Motor installation (diesel or electric 
motor) should be completed as described 

in Part 2 before fitting the cabin in place 

and the original forward deck hatch can 
be left off as this area is covered by the 
cabin. In the case of an electric powered 
model the cabin roof can be cemented 



u n d u I y . 

Many of the models employ a wrap- 
around windshield, which should be cut 

to shape by trial and error from thicker 
plastic sheet. The metal frame outline 

and vertical struts can be indicated by 

painting on in silver. 
Further details such as the pulpit, side 

rails (where appropriate) and deck fit- 



lings such as cleats and fairleads, 

added to the model after painting 
form of 



h 
in 




fittings. These will add 



considerably to ihe 



m of the model 



merely a case of 'convening' this hull by in place permanently. With a diesel and the cost of such fittings is 



iiy 



the addition o( a cabin and related 

details, the cabin shape being different, 

and differently placed, in the seven 
models shown on this month's plan. 

Having done this it may then be neces- 
sary to remeve some of the original after 

decking so as to produce an open cock- 



pit. 



Details like 



this 



are given 



in 



ihe individual descriptions of the various 

models. 



powered model the cabin roof must be 

made detachable, in order to get at the 
engine for starting. 

Glazing of all cabin windows is done 
with clear plastic sheet, which for best 

appearance should be cut to the shane 

of the window, but slightly oversize, and 

cemented on the outside. Alternatively, 

cabin windows can 

black (or cut out 



only a few pence 



h 



You can use 



your own ideas as to what fittings to add 



and 



where to 



pos 



them 



F 



dance on this subject, study photo- 

phs of the full size craft. There is 



really no 

tings, etc.. 



dard 



cl 



> 



for deck fit 



dividual owne 



have 




painted on in 

black paper 



The method of building up the further cemented in position). This is necessary 



models is the same in each case. 



f wo 



cabin sides are required, traced or copied 

off the full size outlines given. These 



in the case of the 'Coronet' cabin 

windows in any case because of the large 

window area. To cut out windows of 



their own ideas on this subject. 

Note: The full size patterns for the 
sides and formers, etc, are to approxi- 
mate size (slightly oversize) to allow for 

chamfering to fit snugly and accurately 

on the deck. It is impossible to give 

exact sizes as individual hulls may vary 











slightly in deck curvature. In all cases, 

therefore, a certain amount of trimming 
up is required on the parts to ensure 

accurate final assembly. This is quite a 

straightforward job and should present 
no difficulties. 

In all cases the sides are cut from i in. 
soft sheet balsa, except where noted (e.g. 

Christina' sides 2 and sides 3) and for 

'Huntress* (sides from 1 in, sheet). 



cut from thicker clear plastic sheet. The 
pennant mast is a length of iV in. dowel 

pushed into the cabin roof and held with 
a touch of cement. 

Other details such as the pulpit and 

rails, anchor, cleats, etc.. can be added 



in the form of plastic fittings obtained 

from any model shop. 

Suggested colour schemes; 



Hull 



white, dark blue or light green; 



?%&& 



Dell Quay Ranger 

Full size patterns are given on the plan 

for cutting the following parts needed to 
complete this model. 



with red, green or blue bottom. 
Decks — white, natural wood or stained 

with a light coloured wood dye. 



Superstructu 




all white. 



2 -Ranger* cabin side pieces cut from Ranger Tropical 




♦ 



i in. sheet balsa. 

I Cabin roof from i in. sheet balsa 

(note pattern is half plan of the shape 
required). 

I Aft cabin roof -f\ in. sheet balsa* (half 

plan shown). 

t Oil each bulkheads Rl, R2, R3 and 

R4, from { in. balsa sheet. 

1 Deck extension cut from |in, sheet. 

2 Grab rails cut from 1 in, sheet. 

2 Air scoops from ^ in. balsa; 5±in. 
length -fa in. dia. dowel; fairly thick 

celluloid or acetate sheet for the wind- 
shield. 

Cut two pieces each from 3 in. wide 

sheet and cement together. 



* 



The cabin 



side 



s need to be slightly 



form to the curvature of the deck and 

stand vertically. Assemble by cementing 

formers Rl. R2. R3 and R4 between the 
sides. Noie that Rl needs to be cham- 
fered top and bottom and is cemented 

only just inside the front edges of the 

i wo sides. This joint is then backed up 

with scrap lengths of \ in. sq. balsa and 



the fr 



on 



t of R I sanded to a curved shape. 



The whole assembly is then cemented 

permanently on to the deck in the posi- 
tion shown on the plan. 

Trim the tops of the formers flush wilh 

e sides, as necessary, and fit the two 



tfc 

roof panels in place. In the case of a 

diesel powered model, do not cement the 

front cabin deck in place but cement a 

frame to the underside to make it a plug 
lit beLween Rl and R2. In the case of 
an electric powered model, the aft cabin 

roof should be made detach able to get 

at the battery compartment. 

Round off the two cabin roofs, shaping 

the ends as necessary, and sand to finish 
Hush with the cabin sides. 



Cement the deck 



P 



i he transom in line with ihe top of the 

deck. 

Windows should be 'glazed' by cutting 

out pieces of clear plastic sheet to the 
same shape as the window cut-outs but 

slightly oversize and then cementing in 

place on the outside. In the case of a 
diesel model, do not glaze the side win- 
dows of the forward cabin. 



The 



superstructure 



is 



finished 



by 



cementing the two grab rails in place to 

the cabin top, shaping the scoops from 



This is very similar to the 'Ranger* 

except that the shape of the sides is 

different from behind the windscreen 

and there is no aft cabin. The sides must 
be cut to the dotted line aft and R3, R4 

and the aft cabin roof are not required. 
The model is fitted up in a similar 

manner as before. When completed the 

after decking is cut away right up to the 

sides from R3 to a distance of 1 in. in 

front o\~ Bulkhead 6 position in the hull. 
Bulkhead 5 should then be cut away 
down to floor level to provide an 

unobstructed cockpit area. 



Suggested coh 



our 



schemes ; as for 



Ranger'. 



chamfered along the bottom edge to con- Slirf rider 




This is the 1964 Power Boat Race 

winner featuring a low cabin shape and 
no windows. Parts required to complete 

this model are: 

2 Sides cut from i in. balsa sheet to the 
shape shown. 

1 Each SI, S2 5 and S3, from i in. sheet. 

I \\ in. sq. panel of -fa in. sheet (hatch). 

Pennant mast cut from tV in. ply. 

SI has to be chamfered to line up with 

the front of the sides, and the bottom 
edges of the sides must be slightly cham- 
fered so that they conform to the curva- 
ture of the deck. Join the sides by 

cementing SI and S2 in place. S3 is 
cemented into the hull itself through the 

cockpit reaching right down to the chine 



sh c 1 1 



When this is fitted, cement the 



rou n 



side assembly permanently in place. 

The cabin roof is shaped from an 

M in, by M in. panel of .1 in. sheet balsa. 

ded off as shown and trimmed down 
flush with the edges of the sides. The 

hatch is sanded to a concave shape on 

the underside to fit snugly on to the deck 
and cemented in place. Add the pennant 

mast, and the simple windscreen cut from 
thin clear plastic sheet 

The whole of the decking from bulk- 
head 5 right aft to the transom (bulkhead 

7) is now cut away between the sides, i.e. 

in line with the deck beams. Bulkheads 

5 and 6 are also cut away vertically right 
down to the chine shelf to produce a 
completely open cockpit. Colour scheme: 

blue or green hull with white bottom. 

Decks and cabin sides and top white, 
with colour band in same colour as hull 



The simple construction of the 'Huntress' Win. balsa and cementing in place and topsides or darker colour. Authentic 



superstructure is fairly representative 



also adding the wrap-around windshield 



racing number '66*. 








hull and line up with the position 



Thunderbird 

This was the second place boat in the 

1965 Power Boat Race, close behind 

'Brave Moppie'. Construction is very 
similar to that of 'Surf rider' except that 

the cabin sides are longer and extend 

well aft to protect the occupants from 

spray. Join sides first with Tl and T2 

(after chamfering Tl and the bottom 

edges of the sides) and then cement to 

tfa 

of the deck beams. 

The cabin top is shaped from a 5£ in, 

by 5i in. piece of | in. sheet balsa (join 

two 3 in. wide pieces) and either cemented 

in place or made a plug fit. 

Cut away the after decking back to the 

point shown on the full size plan and 

cement in a reinforcing piece of £ in. by 

i in. strip running between the two deck 

beams. The backrest is made from i in. 
by i in. strip with four lengths of ^ in. 

strip cemented in place. When set, cement 

in place to the reinforcing strip pre- 
viously fitted. Colour scheme: hull top- 
sides — -yellow, hull bottom, deck and cabin 

sides and top — white. Authentic racing 

number '283' in black on white panel 

on each side, and in black across the 
cabin roof. 

Christina 

A 'Christina* won the first Cowes- 

Torquay Power Boat Race and remains 

one of the 'classic' craft of its type, noted 

also for its attractive styling. 

Parts required to complete this model 
are: 

2 Side Fs from J- in. balsa. 

2 Side 2's from i in. balsa. 
2 Side 3's from £ in. balsa. 
Formers CI and C2 from J in. sheet. 

6 in. by 4 in. by i in. balsa block (for 

front cabin). 
Two 1 1 in. lengths of \ in. by rV in. 

spruce or obeche for handrails. 

About 4 in. of $ in. or t% in. dowel; 

celluloid for windshield. 

Start by fitting former C2 in the posi- 
tion shown on the full size plan. Note 
that this former extends right down to 

the chine shelf and fits between the deck 

beams. Fill in between the sides of this 
former and the sides of the hull below 
the deck line with scrap sheet. 

Now fit the cabin sides and CI, cham- 
fering CI to angle back correctly, and 

also chamfering the bottom edges of the 

sides to conform to the curvature of the 




deck. 



Carve and fit the front cabin 



block, shaping the top curve to match 

the curve of the front window. 

Cement the two Side 2 pieces in place; 
and the two Side 3 pieces outside them, 

as shown. Complete by adding the hand- 
rail supported on short lengths of dowel. 

For greater security of fixing the deck 
can be pierced to insert the dowels which 

are then levelled off and the handrail 
cemented on top. 

The cabin top is covered with tV in. 

sheet balsa. In the case of a dicsel 
powered model the top will have to be 

cemented to a built-up framework so that 




As thousands of readers saw them at the Schoolboys and Girls Exhibition. The Editor's completed, diesel 
powered Brave Moppie, and above, the 'un-skinned' hull, with Dell Quay Ranger superstructure temporarily 

fitted in position, as described in this feature 



access to the motor for starting. 



With 



an electric powered model simply cement 
the rV in. sheet cabin top in place. 

The whole of the aft decking between 



bulkheads 5 



d 7 should now b 



removed, out to the position of the deck 
beams. Bulkheads 5 and 6 are then cut 



down 
beams 



lly in line with th 



deck 



finishes just behind G2. 

The two rails extending back to the 
transom are of i in. by tb in. hardwood 

strip (spruce or obeche mounted on i in. 

sq. uprights (balsa or obeche). This 

rail does not extend across the transom. 

Cut away bulkheads 5 and 6 level with 

cockpit 



open 



d th 



centre pa 



removed to 



leave a completely unobstructed cockpit. 

Colour schemes: hull usually white 

with red, green or blue bottom. 

Decks : natural wood or stained with 
a light coloured wood dye, or painted 



the deck beams to give an 

from G2 aft. 

Colour schemes: hull — white with red. 

blue or green bottom (or all white). 
Deck, cabin sides and top — white. 

Racing number in white on black 

circle. 



white. 
Cab 

white. 



i: Sides 3 and front cabin part, 
Sides 1, mahogany. Sides 2, very 




pale blue or gi 

Sides 2, or v 



Cabin top, same as 



hire 



blue 



oi 



T 



Wrap-around wind 

green tinted celluloid. 



Coronet 

This model has a fairly deep cabin 
with large windows. The windows should 
be painted on rather than cut out, other- 
wise construction is similar to the other 
models, except for the cabin roof. Since 
the cabin shape is 'square', the roof can 

be planked with | in. sheet balsa with 

the grain running from side to side. The 

are then rounded off with sand- 



Huntress 

Designed and built by Fairey Marine, 

the 'Huntress' is a well known offshore 
power boat racer together with its larger 

counterpart, the 'Huntsman'. 

The cabin sides in this case extend 

ast to the transom, but 



backwards almost 

the whole of the cockpit is open 



fro 



m 



F3 (fitted 



bulkhead 




to the tran- 



som. The sides are cut from | 



sh 



Th 



c 



cabin roof for this model is cut 




from | in. sheet carved and sanded to a 
well rounded shape. The front window 
is painted in Fl. Note that Fl is vertical 
and does not slope backwards . 

The windscreen sides are cut from 
rV in. ply and cemented directly on to the 



paper. 

The second former (G2) is shown fitted 

between the deck beams roughly 1 in. 

behind bulkhead 4. If preferred, ihis can 

He extended down to the chine shelf and 

filling the complete space between the 

hull sides to blank off the cabin com- 
pletely. 

The windscreen is built up as a com- 
plete framework of A in. sq. balsa which 

is then covered with panels cut from 
clear plastic sheet after cementing to the 



main side pieces in 



the 



position shown. 



The windshield assembly is then com- 
pleted by covering both sides with cel- 
luloid (or thin plastic sheet) and adding 

a curved windscreen front. The complete 

screen (sides and front) can be cut from 

a single piece of celluloid on a trial and 
error basis, if preferred. 

Typical colour scheme: hull topsides 

— dark blue; bottom — red or white. 



Cabin sides and top — white. 



Racing number 



in 



black on white 









it is a plug fit and can be removed for cabin top. Note that the cabin roof 



circle. 







1 *• 



You need the best Balsa for a job like * Project 66' . . . and 
that means SOLARBO Balsa. Solarbo Balsa Is specia 
selected and graded for modelling use and there just is no 

better Balsa obtainable anywhere. Use Solarbo Balsa for 




all your models. It costs no more, but the brand name 
ensures you that little extra 1 in quality 



"BRAVE 




t* 



□ 4 off 36"x3"x±' r 

□ 1 off 36*x3*x-rV" 

□ 2 off 36*x2"x 

□ 3 off 36"x3*x 
D 2 off 36"x2*x 

□ 6" length 2" x1i" block 

P 6" length 2" x 2" block 




□ 1 off 36"x±"x±* 

□ 3 off 36 # xrx-rV" 



□ 3off36*x 
n 6 off 36* x 




sq 



Other materials required include 

iV ply, balsa cement, tissue and 

pins. 




DELL QUAY RANGER 



HulF material! u for 'Brav* 

Moppie" plut i* sheet for 
cabin sidei ano i m end A* 

*heot for fwd and aft cabin 
topi. 



■ 












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How 



build 



SWUNG 
DMG1N 



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EXPERIENCED 
AMATEUR 




RANGER TROPICAL 



A» *Moppio' plut 4* sheet for 
cabin tides and £ the«t for 

Cabin roof. Same as "Ranger" 

without rear cabin. 






39 



* 



S I 



'"■ 1 1 



BEGINNER 







SURFRIDER 



Baste hutl materials wilt 

leave enough sheet <or cabin 

tides, etc.. i* *heer panel will 

be required for cabin roof- 




THUNDERBIRD 



Cabin sides, etc, from spare 
basic hull materials. 5+* X 
51" xf* panel for cabin roof* 





CHRISTINA 



You may need some extra 

t" sheet for cabin sides and 

rails; also i*x2*x6* front 
cabin block and -rV * sheet for 
cabin roof. 




CORONET 



Some additional |* sheet may 
be required; also ** sheet for 
Cabin roof and tV" sheet owei> 

Cay panels, plus strip for rails. 




F AIREY HUNTRESS 




can be cut from 
36-x2'xr sheet. Cabin 
roof ii 12"X3-xl" Wind. 

iCreen tidei from -fa" P'y» 




SOLARBO LIMITED 

COMMERCE WAY 

LANCING, SUSSEX 



HE BEST BALSA YOU CAN BUY 



- size Construction 

Plan for 10' 6 



SAILING 



DINGHY 



Simple to build, easy to handle 
on lakes or the open sea. Li 

weight construction, sail area 

55 sq. ft. to give speed with com- 
fort. Fits easily on car top. 



16 Page Booklet 

COMPLETE 
GUIDE TO 



All you need to know 



choose 



kind 



timber 



nght 



every job. 



EXTRA! Special Fold-out Sheet to 



build 



• WORK BENCH*SAW BENCH+TOOL BOX 



EXTRA! At-a-glance DATA SHEET 



An illustrated instant reference guide to Screws and Nails 



Packed with fascinating new projects, new ideas and new 

techniques, PRACTICAL WOODWORKING brings you 

Lhe guidance you need iq tackle any kind of woodworking 



w irh 



flan- 



finish of a professional. 



magazine for the handyman, the hobbyist, the do-it-your- 
self enthusiast . . . for the man who enjoys woodworking 

and likes to improve his home. 



ALWAYS ASK 



NAME 



-.■■ 



.,■ 



■. _ r ■ - ■ *i 







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' 



i 



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i 







Y 1980 the Panama Canal will be 
choked with ships. This prediction 
is so probable that President Johnson has 

appointed a committee to study four 

possible routes for an alternative canal 

to be cut through the Central American 

isthmus. The likeliest looking one runs 
from Sasardi to Morti and lies about a 
hundred miles to the east of the Panama 
Canal, still in Panama. Whichever route 
the committee olump for, the cheapest 
method for digging the canal is going to 
be by H-bomb explosions. This is the 

latest way of shifting earth and the tech- 
niques for carrying it out are the concern 

of an organisation set up by the U.S. 



Atomic bombs can be creative 

as well as destructive. 

MICHAEL HOLT tells how 

the U.S. Atomic Energy 

Commission wants to use them 

to dig a new Panama Canal! 

He also reveals some other 

peaceful bomb projects 



that 



may surprise you 



Atomic 



Energy 



Commission 



called 



Project Plowshare. 



The name 'plowshare 1 (American spell- 
ing) comes from Isaiah in the Bible and 
refers to the project's aim of beating 
atomic swords into peaceful plough- 
shares. 

Why is the United States interested in 

building another canal? The reason is 

that the present canal is run by a U.S. 

Government owned organisation, the 
Panama Canal Company. This company 

collects an average of $55 million a year 
in tolls of which it pays the U.S. a size- 
able proportion. Shipping traffic through 

the present canal has been doubling 
every 25 years. Ships pay by size and 
amount of car^o space, an average yearly 
toll for one ship being about $5,000. But 
charges can be staggering. The U.S. 
supertanker, Orion Hunter, paid the 
biggest toll in the canal's history of over 
$30,000. The canal is not large enough 




to take the largest ships and cargo boats. 
Hundreds of ships have to reduce their 
loads to get through. As President 
Johnson said, the new canal "will be free 
of complex, costly, vulnerable locks and 

seaways' unlike the existing canal, that 

will be replaced by a 59-mile canal 60 
feet deep and 1,000 feet wide all along 

joining the Atlantic and Pacific oceans 

directly by a sea level channel for the first 
time in history. This gash will be gouged 
out of the rocky land, 1,000 feet high in 
places in 14 sections by a string of 250 

bombs. The biggest would be 7 mega- 
tons equal in strength to 7 million tons 

of TNT. 

This term megaton needs explaining. 

It rates the explosive strength of a bomb 
by the equivalent number of tons of 
TNT to produce the same sized explo- 
sion. A megaton means 1 million tons. 



Besides the hazard of radioactive fall- 
out, there is the political danger because 

of the perennial unrest in the area. 



Shoul 



the 



Sasardi -Morti route 



be 



chosen, however, it won't allect the 

Panamanians unduly for the route will 

still pass through Panama so that they 
will not lose revenues by the change. 
If it were not for these hazards the pro- 
ject could begin at once. It will likely 



take four years to survey the area, build 



roads, set up bases and establish com- 
munications. Then drilling can start 
Derricks every half-mile will mark the 

explosion sites. Beneath each, a third 

of a mile down, will hang an oil-drum 
sized hydrogen bomb. Before blastin 
begins the last trucks will have departe 




Here's the crater left by the detonation of a 100 kiloton device in the Nevada desert on July 6th, 1962, This was 'Project Sedan' ', and the crater 

measured i t 200 feet in diameter, 320 feet deep. 7 5 million cubic yards of earth were removed by the explosion 








. . 



1 - ■ 






'■: 













* ■ 



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ff 
















with nggers, scientists, and officials. Only 
the birds will break the silence with their 
incessant cries. In far cities citizens will 
wait for the signal to show that the first 
section of the new canal has been blasted 



out. 



Th 



total blasting operation is 



pected to last about two years 
When the canal is built, wh; 



There will b 



then? 



steady fine rain of long 



lived radioactive debris falling over vast 
areas of the world. When the oceans are 
joined for the first time tides will raise 
their own special problems. Pacific tides 



are some size feet high 



the Atla 



th 



those of 



Tidal ba 



gates will be needed 



mile 



an 



h 



that 



and hyd 
itrol the 



follow if 



corrosion and landslides in the canal 
banks are to be prevented. 

But how did scientists discover the way 
use H-bombs for excavating? 

, The very first hydrogen bomb explo- 
sion in 1952 showed its staggering poten- 

tia ities ' 



to 



island 



for earth shifting. A whole 
the Pacific atoll Eniwetok was 

The bomb 



blown clean out of the 

was 500 times stronger than the "one 

dropped on Hiroshima. A large box 

r, it weighed 50 tons and had the 



affa. 

expl i 
TNI 



force oi ](] 



10 m 



B 



million tons of 

1 962 the Plow 



share scientists had fined down the device 

to a canister the length of a telegraph 



III 



and a yard across. 

That summer in the parched, remote 
Nevada desert, they carried out the now 



historic Sedan test. They drilled a h 



635 feet deep 



k the bomb in it and 



off with th 

'Hiroshima 



d it with sand. The bomb went 



losive 



size 



power of five 



bombs. An unde. 
ground bubble of gas formed, unimagin 



ably hot and bursting like an 



xpl 



blister, left a crater j mile across and 
320 feet deep. A study of it helped in 
interpreting the photographs taken by 

Ranker VII of craters on the 
because of their obvious similaritie 



moon 



The 



t 



clean' bomb 



t A typical moon crater has a rim stand- 
ing 100 feet or so above the surrounding 
plain with a steep descent inside to the 
ter floor. This is very similar in shape 

the Sedan crater. 



to 

theory, the moon 



Accord 
craters v» 



th 



to one 

formed 

rockv 



by the impact of meteo , 

boulders that hurtle continuously throug 
space. When a meteorite crashes into 



the 



moon it creates tremendously high 



temperatures which match the tempera 
ture of the Sedan gas bubble. 

The Sedan test showed nuclear excava 



tion is 

remove rocks and eann an m one go 

The bomb cost £160,000 and excavation 

it cost about 6d 



rth all in 



with 



rth shifted 



a cubic yard of 
ghly a hundred times 



cheaper than TNT and other chemical 



' 





bubble' of desert alluvial soil rising as the 'Sedan' device explodes. The 'bubble' rose to a height 



of 290 feet three seconds afte 

they must be buried deeper which 
increases drilling costs. Bigger bombs 
also produce tornado-like air blasts 
1 megaton bomb can break windows 100 
miles away) and earthquake-liJce shock 
waves. Scientists now know how to 
control these hazards. 




>au structures at the right are about 10 feet high 

rivers for irrigation or for industrial use; 
to blow enormous underground caverns 
for storing liquid or gaseous fuels; to 
excavate dams and deepen them to 
eliminate silting up. A handful of nuclear 
tests in different sorts of ground, from 



One 



gran 



rock to desert 



d, should 



of this test and oth 



pected result has come out vide the necessary engineering know-now 




ro- 



using chemical 



to simulate nuclear explosions 



the iir 



When the explosives are properly spaced excavations. 



smooth furrow of even depth 

requirement in most kinds of 



in a row and fired together the sum of 
the separate excavations is greater than 



all the indivkl 



Pi 



is mostly thrown out in ridges j 
furrow and almost none at the 
the furrow. 



The earth 

the 



What of the future 




s of 



Project Plowshare 



d 






B 



th 



scientists' 



still to clean the bomr 
must see how one is 



itest problem is 
To see why. we 



comic name 



H-bombs 



to 



scheme 
of ' 
blow 



only 



recently 



rejoices in the 



Gasbuggy' to use 



out 



underground 



tructed 



An 



H-bomb has an outer layer of litium _ m ___ „ w 

deuteride (deuterium is a close relative Africa to flood the southern desertregion 



caverns as reservoirs for natural gas. 

H-bombs would be the ideal device for 
diverting the waters of Lake Chad in 



isotope, of hydrogen) packed round 



of the Sah 



The uranium 



and 



ggers 



ackm 




dirt cheap. It can break up and of the bomb 



fistful of uramum-2 
releases neutrons by fissi 

the fusion process in the 

A pound only of this packing, fully fuse 
will create a •clean* explosion, equal to 
25,000 tons of TNT. The fly in the oint- 
ment is the uranium trigger in the centre 

Not only does it create 



This is no pipe dream 



has seriously been proposed. Another 

xirently far fetched idea is to use 



apparent! 

H-bombs 



blast a 



Suez 



by-pass 



through the Israel desert from the 



Med 



to the P 



Crulf: th 



a 'dirty' biological hazard, it is expen 

sive, costing nearly £2,000 a pound. The 



was proposed by an American scientist 
at the time of the Suez crisis in 1957. 

But perhaps Project Plowshare' s most 



amh 



scheme in a power-hungry 



match to light the fire 



more expensive than the fire itself 



peak, far 



explosives. But what were the 



gs? 



The test also produced dangerous fall 



The unknown 

The Sedan bomb was 30 per cent 

„,„ . . M , Crt . t -- --- — - 'dirty* due to its fission products, but 

was detected 50 miles away. Today this today bombs that are 99-9 per cent 



world is its plan to form an artificial lak_ 

in North Africa to create hydro-electric 
power. 

Not 40 miles from the Mediterranean 



out; 10 times the normal 



radiation th 



ckground 



rams on us all the time 



Sea lies th 

depression 

Great C 



rthernmost ti 



early the size of Wa 




of 



giant 
. the 



called 



uattara Depression, as it is 
u'ch is some 440 feet below sea 



di 



has been just about halved 
The 'clean' bomb of tomorrow will 



clean' are possible 



However 



entists still don't know 



probably reduce this figure to a mere what are the long term effects of the 

unfused (unexploded) critium because its 



level with only a narrow range of hills 
hundreds of feet high cutting it off from 
the sea* If a canal were gashed through 



mile or two. It 



fe for a man 



to enter the Sedan crater until four 



months after the expl 



Today that 



subtle dangers are tricks to predict 



the range, the dc 

with sea water. 



pression would fill up 
This would evaporate 



To sum 



figure would only be a matter of weeks m m w _ iiu tijw vt 

Bombs work out cheaper the bigger existing "machines" to "b uild "mountain 



moving 



.up, 
devices can 



powered earth 

extend the range of 



at a colossal rate — nine mill i 



mi 



million gall 



a year — and create a 



they are but, to avoid excessive radiation 



passes for roads and trains; to redirect 



steady flow of water, which could then 
be harnessed to provide electricity for the 
whole of the United Arab Republic 



11 







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HE Bascule swing 
in last month's magazine is only part 




complel 



scene that can be built round 



it. and which can. when finished, be 



nlet 



unit to a model 



added as a con: 

railway. 

There are many advantages in building 

the scenic section or bridge base, as a 
complete unit, and one of the greatest is 
undoubtedly the ease with which the 

can be built 
bridge mechanism, 



scenery and the base itself 

It will also allow the 



situated below the base, to be properly 
adjusted. There is, of course, nothing 



to stop th 



of you that wish t fr 



Ull 



building the base in situ on the layout, 
but if, like me, you find it difficult to lean 



over baseboards 



der than about 18 



inches, you will realise the difficulty 
added to construction. The bridge base 
is, in any event, considerably wider than 

18 inches, and would therefore make 

the task of building the surrounding 

scenery ar 

even more difficult 



d making final adjustments 



You will need, to build the base, six 



Making a realistic 
setting for our 

swing bridge is 

described here by 

MIKE RICKETT 

The mechanism is 
shown on 
page 36. 



and final surface of the base, and a total 
area of about 18 in. by 9 in. would be 



admittedly an important one — of the quite adeq 



Four of the 2 in. by 1 



pieces will need to be shortened by 2 in 



and the remaining two, which are i 
for the side of the base, left their orig 



ed 



len gtb 



The shorter pieces will be used 



for the end and middle supports, which 
also incidentally form the sides of the 
canal. The top of the base — that is the 
river bed, and also the canal banks — can 
be made from either plywood or hard- 



make the canal too shallow. I have built 
the surface of the canal at a height of 
1 in. from the bed, and this I think gives 
the right affect. This measurement can, 

however, be varied, and generally, the 

deeper the canal, the stronger the ends 
of the base will be. 

A slot must be cut in each end piece 

if a 'dam' appearance is to be avoided, 

and it will be necessary to draw a line 

the depth of the canal — in my case 1 in. 
along each piece. The width is also 

marked on in the right position, and a 
saw cut made down to the correct depth. 

It is advisable, when doing this, to hold 

the end member in the right position 
against the base, and to mark the width 
on in situ, 

A chisel can be used to cut away the 
wood above the line between the two 






board about A 



thick. I have used 



saw cuts, or an alternative is to use a 
coping saw if your chisel work is not 

all it should be. Once these two slots 
have been made, the two end pieces can 

be nailed, or preferably screwed, into 

position. 

The base is now complete, and it 

should be quite a rigid structure. If any 
pieces show a tendency to come apart, 
it is wise to screw them together and not 

to depend on the nails you will already 

have used, Where the structure is to be 

be cut, all 2 ft. 6 in. long, and 1 6 in. t 7 in. added to an existing layout as a complete 
and 7 in. wide. These should be nailed unit, firm joints are not quite as impor- 



the latter because of its lower price and 
also because the surface will be covered 

over at a later stage. It is, however, 



fortunately necessary to nail into th 



surface materi 



d this is th 




serious disadvantage in using hardboard. 

Once the material for the base surface 

has been decided upon, three pieces can 



to the edees of the four shorter pieces 



tant (although they are still desirable), 



as shown in one of our photographs, since the layout substructure itself will 
leaving the two longer pieces for the 



ends. 



Before these can be nailed on 



* 



tend to keep the base together. One 

point that I cannot stress enough, how- 



pieces of 2 in. by 1 in. timber, 2 ft 6 in. you must decide what depth to have your ever, is that the base be made as flat as 

long, and also material 2 ft 6 in. square canal. Remember that an additional piece possible. Time spent at this stage will 

for the surface. Later, off cuts of ± in of softboard will eventually be laid on save many hours of frustration later on. 

fibre board will be needed for the second 



to the hardboard, and do not therefore 



fhe reason for this is that the bridge will 









12 














tend to lift or sink at both ends where 

the base has any tendency to undulate, 

and this can make final adjustment of 
the track very difficult. If possible, 
use a spirit level to ensure that the base 

is flat in all direction before proceeding 

any further. 

A hole should now be drilled for the 
bridge pivot, and although its exact posi- 
tion is not terribly important, do ensure 
that there is at least one inch of "ground" 



Check that the radius lines marked on 
the base coincide with the actual curve 



made 




the bridge, and make any cor- 



rections that may be necessary with a felt 
tipped pen. Remember, however, that 
approximately i in. of rail should pro- 
trude beyond the end of the bridge, and 
do not position the pen at the ends of 

these, but at the outside, leaning against 
the corner of the bridge end. 

When you are quite satisfied that you 



obliterating knife marks which can ruin 

scenery. Do not plaster the inside edges 

of the softboard since this might cause 
an obstruction to the bridge, and will in 
any event be covered with brickpaper ai 

a later stage. 

A mixture consisting of one pan 
plaster to one of sand is used for the 
two bridge wells, since this is not 

intended to represent earth, but rather 

concrete or rock. Both exist in dock or 



round the bridge ends, both when it is have drawn accurate lines on the base, canal areas and you therefore have a 

open and closed. Also, be careful to and that the bridge itself is not lifting choice when painting the surface. This 

avoid the timber support on the side of or drooping at any particular point, and should not be roughed up with the knife 

the canal that you decide to pivot the that it is about 1 in. above the base, off- edge as for the earth parts, but smoothed 



bridge, and drill the hole at least two 

inches behind this piece of timber. 
Once the hole has been drilled, the 

radius of both ends of the bridge can be 

marked on to the hardboard surface with 

a felt tipped pen, by simply holding 

against the edge of the bridge and turn- 
ing through 90 degrees. The resultant 



cuts of i in, thick softboard can be cut 



over with the flat part of the knife. Only 



to shape with a sharp modelling knife small areas should be dealt with at any 



and then nailed to the surface with 1 in. 
panel pins. An example of this can be 
seen in one of the photographs. 

Once both banks have been covered 

in this way, and the curve on both sides 
of the canal accurately cut and trimmed, 



one time, and it is wise to make only 
small mixes, 

The bridge should once again be tested 
loose on its pivot to ensure that nothing 
is restricting its movement, and if all is 
satisfactory, it can be screwed on to its 



lines indicate the space the bridge will allowing the bridge to swing freely, the pivot, according to the position of the 



need to turn, and they can be used to 
complete the shape of the two wells 

one each side of the canal — that will 

eventually be formed. 

The Meccano mechanism that has 



'ground* mixture can be prepared. Our 
old friend Polyfilla is used once again, 
with a quantity of fine silver sand mixed 

to proportions of about 2 to 1 of sand 



to give a rough appearance 



This 



is 



commutator in the bridge mechanism. 

The easiest way of adjusting the bridge 

and mechanism is to run the motor in 

either direction until the commutator 

reaches the end of its travel and the 



been specially designed for this bridge, made in small mixes, because of the fast motor stops. Do not, under any circum- 
and which is described elsewhere in this drying time of the plaster, and is then stances, try turning the bridge when it is 



issue, can now be screwed on to the 

underside of the base, leaving approxi- 
mately fV in. of rod protruding above 

the board. The bridge itself can now be 
loosely mounted on this rod, allowing it 
to swing round through 90 degrees. 



spread over the surface of the softboard. 

Deal with only small areas at any one 

time, and rough the mixture up gently 
with the edge of the knife to bring the 
sand in the mixture into relief. This will 



also 



have 



the 



secondary effect 



of 



screwed to the pivot, since this may 
cause damage to the mechanism gearing. 
Once the motor has stopped, the bridge 
can be turned until in the appropriate 
position, and the two nuts under the 
bridge tightened up. 




RIVER 

SURFACE 



Next month Mike 

Rickett will com- 
plete the scenic 
setting and deal 

with the construc- 
tion of the canal 




SWJN<j 
"BRIDGE 



Nailing the hardboard 

surface on to the cross 
supports of 2 In. by 1 in, 
timber, and showing the 

radius lines of the bridge 
ends 



&QARO 2*1 TfM8£R ^ 




RivEt? 
SURFACE 



i 

I 

I 
SECTION 




D Nailing the off cuts of 

° softboard on to the 

hardboard surface after 

they have been trimmed to 
shape with a modelling 
knife 



I 




ay wood e»EP 

TO R'VER 



Spreading the mixture 

of plaster and sand 
over the covering of soft- 
board 













ummmnmma 







rv&jf?. 



— l' 



... 






■ _■_-_■ 



- 



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- ■ : 



III 




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iii'i 




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i ■ 
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I 





13 







(20), Poseidon (35), and Hades (20 miles). 

These were discovered between 1904 and 
1951. The four last-named revolve in an 
opposite direction to the rest, Hades taking 
758 days to complete a revolution. 




Mini-coin 

Q. When did the silver threepenny 'bit' 

become- obsolete? — B. F. W., Maidstone. 



A 



This coin has not been minted for the 



Have you a problem— in science, history, litera- 
ture or any other subject— to which you cannot 
find the answer? 
Ask Tom Sheridan and he will do his best to 

answer it. Questions should be sent on post- 
cards bearing your lull name and address, but 
these will not be published if you put them in 
brackets and Just add your initials. Address them 

to Tom Sheridan, Meccano Magazine, Thomas 
Skinner and Co. (Publishers) Ltd., St. Alpnagfl 

House. Fore Street, London, E.C.2. 



United Kingdom since 1941, but it is 
estimated that about 70 million of them 

are still in circulation. 



Writing machine 

. When was the first typewriter invented 

R. H. f Birmingham, 

. The first patent for a typewriter 




A. 

granted as long ago as 1714. The 

was Henry Mill, an English water 

but the patent does not disclose 
machine worked 



wa s 



ngineer 
how hi 



and no drawings have 
survived. The first writing machine known 
to have been built was the Typographer, 



patented in Detroit, U.S.A 



in 



829 by 



William Austin Burt. It could not prod 



more than five words a minute. 



Man> 



experimental 

England, France 



models were produced in 



It:, 



and elsewhere 



to city centres, such cars would help to get 
rid of traffic jams. Visualised for city 
streets is a car which could run at a top 
speed of 30 m.p.h., cover 50 miles on one 
battery charge, and recharge overnight on 

13-amp. domestic mains. Fuel cost would 

be a fraction of a penny per mile. 

So be it 

, What is the origin of the word Amen, 
and what does it mean? — S. L. Baker, 
Holbeach, Lines. 

A. It is an old Hebrew word meaning 
verily, or so be it. The early Christians used 
to shout it after the bread and wine had 




Floating menace 

Q. How much of an iceberg floats under- 
water?— H. T. B.. Falmouth. 

A. The popular belief is that nine-tenths 
of an iceberg is below the surface of the sea. 
Hut the density of glacier ice is always less 
than that of freshwater ice. The density of 
sea water also varies, but is always greater 
than pure water. An iceberg, therefore, 
tends to ride higher in the sea than a lump 
of pond ice in freshwater. Measurements 
taken by the International Ice Patrol near 
Newfoundland show that between five- 
sixths and a half of most icebergs is sub- 
merged. Bergs coming down from Green- 
land into the North Atlantic (one of which 
is pictured here) are often more than 200 ft. 
in height; the maximum height recorded is 

447 ft. Though few normally exceed 1,000 ft. 

in length, they may be as much as 3,000 ft, 
long. 



mac 



was 



before the first practical 

designed by Christopher Sholes, a printer 
in Milwaukee, U.S.A., who took out 
patents in 1868. It was from this machine, 
first marketed in 1875, that the famous 
Remington typewriter developed. 



bee 



blessed in 



Lord's Supper; so it Blackpool trams 



came to be said at the end of prayers and 



sung to conclude psalms and hymns 



The 




Is there a book giving the history of the 



f 



word is also used in Jewish synagogues and 
in Moslem mosques. 



Battery 




batu. 

petrol 



Why can't electricity, supplied by 
ies, be used in cars in preference to 



moons? 



A 



Nicholas Thorn, Slouch 



At least three small car manufacturers 



are now working on 



ng them to 



elect 



PC 



successful 




If the prototypes are 

ially designed electric cars 

follow. They are likely to 



Jupiter's moons 

Q. Can you tell me the names and some 
thing about Jupiter's twelve 
Ronald Catherick, South Belmont, Ayr. 

A, Only four of Jupiter's satellites are big 
enough to be seen with a small telescope. 
First observed by Galileo, they are (with 
diameters in miles): lo (2,310), Europa 



Blackpool tramways, with a route map 

C. A. Gankroger, King's Lynn. 

A. See The Tram Thar Went to America, 

by D. F. Phillips and F. K. Pearson, 
available price Is. 3d. from the Light 

Railway Transport League (Publication 

Officer), 21 Endymion Road, London, N.4. 

Railway sounds 

Q. Where can I obtain tape recordings of 

railway locomotives? — Michael Peacock, 
Gateshead, 



(1,750), Ganymede (3,200) and Callisto A. F. C. Judd (Sound Recording) Ltd., 



ghtly more than petrol-dri 



cost si 

vehicles, but overall running 

be halved. Besides 



should 



iding a cheap 



means of transport by which 



ee 



peopl 



Id commute from the suburbs 



(3,220), Nearer the planet is Amalthea 
(about 100 miles diameter), discovered in 
1892; and revolving in orbits beyond 
Callisto at distances of 7,120.000 to 
14,7000.000 miles are Hestia (100), Hera 

'30), Demeter (25), Adrastea (15), Pan 



■ 



174 Maybank Road, South Woodford 

London, E.18, will supply you with sound 

effects of steam, diesel and electric locos on 
a single full-track, 3| irp.s. tape, suitable for 
any tape recorder, or on a 45 r.p.m. disc. 
The disc costs 8s. 6d., the tape 1 8s. 6d. 




■ 

* ■ 



; 



■ 



. 



14 





BE ATT IE 



EXPRESS 



your 




\t 



■*■ 



MARCH 

to extend 
your 

layout ! 



t 



oo 

Run your trains with 

smooth prototype real- 
ism. Streamline works 



su 



perbly 



"right 




SEND FOR THE FEBRUARY EDITION OF THE 



BEATTIE EXPRESS 

CONTENTS 

Latest News frorrvTri-ang/Minic. 

What is happening to Wrenn? 

Hornby Dublo 3 rail track 
position- 
Residue of Hornby rolling 
stock. 
Trix plans for 1966. 

Secondhand "O" gauge offers. 
The future of Flexible Track. 
NOTES ON BRIGHTON TOY 
FAIR, 



POST FREE 

Latest for the "Scenery Builder 

On using Falier "Profiles". 

"CRAB" LoCO- 



Lasc 



Japan s 



motives. 
Buying a lathe by instalments. 

Five plans for Tri-ang Trains. 

Will Budget check Continental 

imports? 

New "COPPING LOCO DRAW- 
INGS". 

NOTES ON LINES BROS. TOY 
FAIR. 



This should be ready for posting about 5th February. 



CATALOGUES FOR YOUR GUIDANCE 



and 
Amazingly flexible, 



universal 



Bcattics Railway Catalogue for 

Racing Car Catalogue 



1966. 

Bcattics 



it can be curved to any radius 

without the need for cutting ties 



the fine scale 
longer look 



for 1966. 

Beatties Bargain Book 
1966. 



Tri-ang 1966 Illustrated Catalogue. 
Marklin Illustrated Catalogue. 

FALLER Illustrated Catalogue 



post fr 



ee 



N gauge (OOO), The "small brother" of OO and engineered to 

the same high standard of precision. Nickel silver rail on 

unbreakable plastic base with 200 sleepers to the yard. Fully 

universal. 

00/9. Streamline in 9 mm. narrow gauge. Beautifully made 
with authentic "random" sleepering. Can be curved easily^ to 

match the tight turns and twists usual in narrow gauge practice. 

Ask to see Streamline at your Model Shop 



VISIT OUR THREE WONDERFUL SHOPS OR ORDER BY POST FROM SOUTHoATE 



^ _ 



5. THE BROADWAY. LONDON. N 14 
HtM SoutHfAtt tut* PAL 4)S« 



run 



PRITCHARD PATENT PRODUCT CO LTD 



SEATON 



DEVON 



London Showroom 
112 High Hotborn. 
W«C1* opposite the 
Holborn Tube Station. 

HOLborn 6285. 



Manchester Showroom 

28 Corporation Street* 

BLAckfriars 0229. 




high impact plastic. Features 



cannons. 



authentic insignia, 
very successful WEN-MAC -049 glow- 
motor 
and with 3 bladed nylon propeller. 

attractive 



Camphtm 

control Jino handf 



carton 

Tcrylmnm line*, f/ow- 

plug clip, imad, battery plug and full 
ifMfrucfront. 





COMPLETE 



INC. 




THE KK HURRICANE ATYOUR LOCAL MODEL SHOP TODAY ! 



15 



fl 



'■ ■ I 



■"■ 



r» 



■. 



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'A. 




■ * ■ 






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V* 

iluT 



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tVi 1 





TWENTY-FIVE years ago, during the 
Autumn and Winter that followed 

the Battle of Britain, the Royal Air 
Force began to take an increasing toll of 
German night bombers sent to attack 



London and other cities. Newspapers P-70 Havocs. 



survival in war. So, to fill the gap until 
a specially-designed night fighter could 
be designed and built, they fitted A.I. 

radar and extra guns to 164 Douglas 

A-20 bombers, which were redesignated 



explained that R.A.F. pilots were eating 

raw carrots by the dozen, and that the 



Meanwhile, the Northrop company 
was given a contract to develop the corn- 



looked so sinister, with its armament 
blisters above and below the fuselage, 
that it became known as the 'Black 
Widow', after the venomous spider of 
that name. 

Basically, the XP-61 Black Widow was 

n tail- 

under- 

Pratt and 



an all-metal monoplane, with twi 
booms, a retractable tricycle 



carriage 



d two 2.000 h 



Whitney R- 2800 -10 Double Wasp 18- 
cylinder radial engines. An unusual 
feature was that it had only tiny ailerons, 
at the tip of each wing, leaving most 
of the trailing-edge free for large flaps. 

These enabled it to land at only 80 



m.p.h., in half the dista 



needed by 



other aircraft of its weight and high 

speed performance. 



To 



supplement 



the 



tiny 



ailerons, 



retractable spoilers were fitted in slots 



forward of the flaps on each wing. 



it 



was the first time that control surfaces 



vitamins in these vegetables helped to pletely new night fighter that was needed of this kind had been used on opera 



give them exceptional vision in the 
dark. In fact, the key to Fighter Com- 
mand's ability to find and track down the 
Luftwaffe aircraft at night was contained 
in the letters 'A.F — standing for Air- 
borne Interception radar carried by its 
night fighters. 

Over in America, the U.S. Army Air 

Corps, (re-named U.S. Army Air Forces 

in mid- 1941) knew the secret of Britain's 



so urgently. The Job was not easy, and 
the choice of Northrop to tackle it was 
rather suprising as they had never before 
had a fighter accepted for production. 

This lack of experience was hardly 

serious as the new aircraft, designated 
P-61, had to carry so much armament, 
fuel and equipment, and so many crew 
members, that it finished up larger and 

heavier than the P-70 Havoc, which had 



tional aircraft and they proved so effec- 
tive that the Black Widow could out- 
manoeuvre any other American fighter 
of its period. Top speed was 369 m.p.h. 
at 20,000 ft, service ceiling 33,100 ft 
and combat range 700-800 miles. 

A.I. radar developed by the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology from 
current British sets, was mounted in the 



successes against enemy raiders and begun life as a bomber. 



of the fuselag 



crew were 



nee 



IliCt 



with 



Three air- 

the radar 



asked for samples of our radar sets. 
Except for two prototype Curtiss PN-1 
biplanes bought in 1921, it had never 



The first of two prototype XP-6ls flew operator behind the pilot in a raised 



on May 21, 1942, only 16 months after 

Northrop received a U.S.A.A.C. contract 



cockp 



and 



a gunner 



glazed cab 



had any specialised night fighters; but its to begin its design and construction. 20 mm. car 



to the rear. Armament comprised four 



with 60(1 



leaders realised that the time had come 

when such aircraft were essential for 



After a time, it was given the usual night 

fighter camouflage of black paint and 



ammun 



in a 




fair 



unds of 
lc under 



the fuselage and a remotely-controlled 



16 






' 



dorsal turret containing four 0-50 in. 



machine guns, with 1,600 rounds. 



The 



turret was normally locked to fire 

forward, under the control of the pilot, 

but could he used also by the gunner as 

defensive armament, with a 360-degree 

Held of tire. 



Development 

Flight testing went well, except that 

the dorsal turret created airflow problems 
over the tail unit, leading to 'buffeting*. 

Nothing could be done about this on 

the 13 pre-production YP-61s and the 

first 37 production P-6IA Black Widows, 

as they were too far down the assembly 

line. To save time, the U.S.A.A.C. had 

ordered the YP-61s on March 1941, a 
first batch of 150 P-61As on September I 
of the same year and a further 410 on 
lebruary 12, 1942 — all before the first 
ilight of the prototype. 

From the 38th P-61A onward the types th 



turret was deleted and the crew reduced 






to two. Another change from aircraft 
No. 46 was the introduction of R-28O0-65 



engines, capable of giving up to 2,250 
h.p. each in an emergency. 

Altogether, 200 P-61As were built. 
Delivery to front-line squadrons began in 

1944 and the first success in action was 
recorded by a crew from the 421st Night 

Fighter Squadron who trailed and shot 

down a Mitsubishi 'Dinah' twin-engined 

bomber over Japen Island, off the coast 

of New Guinea, on July 7. 

In the same month, Northrop began 

delivery of 450 P-6lBs. These differed 

I rum the *A* mainly in having underwing 
attachments for four l f 600-lb. bombs or 

300-gallon drop fuel tanks. So equipped, 
they became intruder fighters, able to 

harass targets deep in enemy territory, 

as well as formidable night fighters. 

Furthermore, the tail buffeting problems 
had been overcome by this time; so the 

dorsal turret and third crew-member 

were reinstated on the last 250 P-61Bs. 

Black Widows first reached units in 



Europe in August 1944, and 




the end 




Production version of the 'Reporter' with engine supercharger intakes and underwing pylons for long-range 

fuel tanks. Our conversion (overleaf) was based on the modified, unsupercharged P-61A 




they were far superior to the makeshift 

;y replaced, the opposi 
had improved. To increase performan 

Northrop switched productic 



to 



new 



del 



the 



P-61C 



■A 



charged R-2800-73 



g 



turbosuper- 
giving 2,800 



h.p. each. The 'C had a ton speed of 



no less than 430m.p.h. and 



ma 



of 



41,000 ft; but only 41 had been built by 
the end of the war, when further pro- 
duction was cancelled. 

In addition to the three production 
versions of the Black Widow, there were 



two 



experimental marks. 



The 



two 




XP-6lDs were converted from 'As' and 

had R-2800-77 engines with new turbo- 
superchargers. Two XP-61Es ? completed 

in 1945, were converted 'Bs' with 
R-2800-65 engines. They were intended 

as prototypes for a long-range day fighter 

version of the Black Widow and had a 

smaller, more streamlined fuselage, with- 
out radar and top turret and with a crew 

of two seated under a one-piece blister 
canopy. Four 0-50 in. machine guns in 

the nose supplemented the under-fuselage 

cannon. 

Main task of the 'E' was to be the pro- 
tection of U.S. Bomber forces in the 



built, the Allies had battled their way so 

close to Japan that there was no need for 

such a fighter. So one of the XP-6lEs 
and a P-61A were converted into proto- 
types of a photo-reconnaissance aircraft 

known as the F-15 Reporter. 

The Reporter carried six cameras, had 

a top speed of over 440 m.p.h. and could 

ily more ih.sn 4,000 miles when fitted 

with underwing tanks. To make life 
easier for the pilot on such long flights, 

his seat could be tilted back to a reclin- 
ing position, like the passenger seats in 

an airliner, enabling him to rest while 
the autopilot was in control. Unfortu- 
nately, by the time the Reporter entered 
service, the jet aircraft had already made 

piston - engined reconnaissance aircraft 

obsolescent and only 36 F-15As were 

built. They remained in service from 
1946 until 1952, being redesignated RF- 

61C during the last four years of their 



active life. 



John W. R. Taylor 



Data 




BIB): 



Span 66 ft. Length 49 ft. 7 in. Height 

14 ft. 8 in. Wing area 664 so., ft. Weight 

empty 22,000 lb.; loaded 29,700-38,006 lb. 
Max. speed 366 m.p.h. at 20,000 ft. Climb 



of that year equipped all night fighter Pacific, during long-distance raids on to 20,000 ft. in 12 min. Service ceiling 



squadrons of the U.S.A.A.F. Although 



Japanese targets. By the time it was 



33,100 ft. Max ferrying range 3,000 miles 










This drawing shows details of the four-gun top turret and positions 
of bombs andjor fuel drop tanks— make them for your model 





■fa Turn the page for full details about how to convert 

the Frog 'Black Widow* kit into a 'Reporter' 



17 




Subject of the latest FROG plastic kit, and also featured 

in John Taylor's article on page 16, The Northrop 

'Black Widow 1 offers the 'plastic surgeon' lots of scope 
for his skill and ingenuity. On these two pages, Doug 
McHard shows how ihe converted the 'Black Widow' 
into a sleek photo-recce 'Reporter 1 . 



Compare this photograph of the com- 
pleted model with those on pages 16 

and 17 
































E£ 




18 


























Cement the rear transparency 
in position and allow it to set 
completely. Then saw off the top 
of fuselage, using the horizon- 
tal line just above the wing root 

as a guide. 



M^A- . X . 



File the upper fuselage contour 

to a gentle curve, and cut a 
piece of 30 thou. Plastikard 
(polystyrene sheet) slightly 
oversize. Cut out the cockpit 
area and then cement in place. 



This full size photograph of th 
modified fuselage shows th 



act 



tour 



hap 



of th 



PP 




"-""' 



Body Putty' is 



d to 



build up the nose. Add an extra 




to th 



g 



length— a 



THE COCKPIT CANOPY 



thin layer at a time. The sam 
material is used to fill in the gu 



ports in the lower fuselage, 
shape the two top nose bliste 



to 



d to build 



p th 



flat-bot 



tomed 'box' just ahead of the 
nosewheel bay. Sand off all 
panel ridges with No. 400 car- 



borundum pap 



d 



Pi 



them by the scored lines wh 

shown. 



The shapely transparency does a lot to 

transform the somewhat angular Black Widow 

into a sleek Reporter. Its production is not at 

,11 difficult. 

Carve a solid wooden canopy from some 
close grained wood such as Parana Pine or 
Lime. Make the wooden forme a little deeper 

that the finished transparency and slightly 

smaller in other dimensions to allow for the 

thickness of the clear sheet. The forme must 
be smoothed to a very fine finish. It should then 

be drilled and mounted on a -fc in. dowel. Now 

cut a hole in a piece of i in. thick plywood 

slightly larger ail round than the plan view of 
the forme. Smooth the inside edges of the 

hole and round off the upper edges. 
The canopy is moulded from clear acetate 

sheet. This material is a thermo plastic and 



After silver painting, indicate 

the positions of the camera becomes soft when heat is applied" Tt should 

windows using dark blue paint 
to which has been added a 
touch of silver. Notice that all 
camera windows are filed 'flat' 



before 

applied. 



the 



base 



colour 



is 



Wing-walk areas are defined by 
black outline applied with a 

charged with 




pen, 

thinned 



down paint. 



ruling 
slightly 

Follow the lines aire 

graved on the wing surface and 

use a straight-edge guide. 




en- 



be no less than 15 thou, thick, thinner sheets 
are difficult to mould. Cut a piece of acetate 
about 2 in. by 3* in, and r using drawing pins 
secure it to the plywood as shown in pic A. 

Now hold the mounted acetate in front of an 

electric fire until it becomes quite soft and 
floppy. At this point the forme should be very 
quickly pressed into the hole which will draw 
the clear sheet over the forme to produce the 
canopy. (Pic B.) 
The process is simple but it needs practice 

to achieve perfection. The acetate cools very 

quickly, so you must be very nippy to get the 
forma through the sheet before it cools and 
re-hardens. If it does cool before you can 
strike, it is easily re-softened by re-heating. 

TOO THIN a sheet of acetate will cool too 

rapidly to allow you to work comfortably. 
TOO SMALL a piece of acetate will not stretch 





Pic C: Here's the finished transparency 

ready for trimming 



sufficiently to produce a good moulding. 

TOO MUCH heat will cause the acetate 

to blister and bubble. 

TOO LITTLE heat will produce a milky ap- 
pearance in the finished transparency. 

Polystyrene sheet cannot be moulded in this 
way, and acetate cannot be stuck with poly- 
styrene cementl So you must stick your 

finished cockpit cover to the body with a 

contact adhesive such as Evo-Stik. A neat 

way to do this is to leave the transparency with 

shallow 'skirts' each side, below the line of the 
cockpit edge. These can then be stuck to the 
inside edges of the cockpit opening. 





19 




Build a baggage truck Part 2 








N these pages last month I gave full 

building instructions for a Meccano 
model based on the Lansing Bagnall 
TD220, a small but powerful tractor 
similar to those used to pull baggage 
trucks at railway stations. Illustrated 



with 



the tractor was 



an 



extremely 



interesting trailer that also was based on 
a piece of real-life equipment, and you 
will find constructional details for this 
below. The full-size version is, in fact. 



a pallet trailer of a new design, incor- 
porating a hand-operated hydraulic lift, 

which makes it virtually self-loading. 

A three-wheeled frame affair, it can 
be easily moved into position straddling 
a pallet which is then picked up on the 

forks by actuating the hydraulic system. 

Once off the ground, the trailer is free 



to 



move. 



l; 



specially-provided 




however, 



a 



can be locked 



across the end of the trailer. This bar 
carries a pin, which can be fitted into the 

at the end of the handle of another 



"eye" 

trailer and in this way a whole "trailer 

train" can be formed. 

Turning to the Meccano model, this is 
built up from two 54 in, "U" girders 1, 

each obtained from two 5 in. Angle 

Girders. Girders 1 are connected at one 



end by a 4| in. 



u 



U 



ji 



girder 2, obtained 



Irom two 41 in. Angle Girders. Bolted 
to the top flange of girder 2 is a U in. by 
ljin. Flat Plate 3 overlayed along three 
sides by three 11 in. Angle Girders 4. A 
4£ in. Strip 5, carrying two i in. Reversed 

Angle Brackets 6, is bolted between 

girders L 
Fixed to the outside of each girder 1 

is a 1 ' in. Corner Bracket 7, in which is 

joumalled a 5i in. Rod held in place by 
a Ratchet Wheel 8 and an eight-hole 
Bush Wheel 9, and supporting a i in. 



The interesting trailer for the baggage truck (described last month and illustrated below). Based on the 

Lansing Bagnall design, this working model — fitted with the new six gear Power Drive motor unit — makes 

an exciting project 



Pinion 10. A Threaded Pin attached to 

the Bush Wheel acts as a handle. Secured 

to one of the Corner Brackets is a Fish- loose Pulley with Rubber Ring and a 

plate and fixed in this is a Pivot Bolt Collar, in that order. The Pulley must 



inside of girder 1. Mounted on the 

Threaded Pin are two Washers, a 1 in. 



carrying a Pawl with boss. The Pawl 
engages with the Ratchet Wheel, 



A 



t* 



fork" is now built up irom two 



i i ii . 



3±in. Strips 11 connected by a 2* in. 
Strip to which three Cranks are bolted. 
Fixed in the bosses of the Cranks, respec- 
tively, are a 2 in. Rod, a 2\ in. Rod 12, lugs, a 1 in. Corner Bracket extended by 



revolve freely. 

In the case of the single front wheel, 
the assembly is a little more complicated. 

although not difficult. A 1 in. by 

Double Bracket is lock-nutted to the 

front of Flat Plate 3 and, to each of its 



carrying a Worm and two Washers, and 
another 2 in. Rod. The Rods are passed 



through Strip 




making sure that the 



Worm engages with Pinion 10. 

Wheel Arrangement 

Both rear assemblies are similarly built. 

A Threaded Pin is fixed in a 1 1 in. Flat 
Girder 13 which, in turn, is bolted to the 



a li in. Strip 14 is bolted. A if in, Rod 

carrying a 1 in. loose Pulley with Rubber 
Ring flanked by four Washers on each 
side, is journalled in the Double Bracket, 
being held by Collars. 

A 1 in. Rod, on which is mounted a 
Coupling Hanked by two Washers each 



side, is journalled in the end holes 



i 



I 



end 



an 

the 








Strips 14, the Rod passing through 

traverse smooth bore of 

Coupling. Fixed in the longitudinal bore 
of the Coupling h a 3v in. Rod 15 to the 
end of which an End Bearing is secured. 

This End Bearing "mates" with the Small 
Fork Piece, mentioned last month, which 

is attached to the rear of the Tractor. A 

Peking pin is provided by a 1 in. Rod 

Spanner 



carrying a Collar. 

Parts required 




1 of No. 2a 

2 of No. 5 

t of No. 5a 

2 of No. 6a 
4 of No. 9 

2 of No. 9a 

3 of No. 9b 
1 of No. 10 

1 of No. 11a 

1 of No. 14a 

1 of No. 16 

1 of No. 16b 



2 of No. 17 

1 of No. 18a 

2 of No, 18b 

3 of No. 22 
1 ol No. 24 
1 of No. 26 
1 of No. 32 

32 of No. 37a 

31 of No. 37b 

30 ol No. 38 

3 of No. 59 

3 of No. 62 



1 of No. 63 

1 of No. 74 

2 of No. 1 03h 

3 of No. 115 
2 of No. 125 
2 of No. 133 

2 of No. 133a 
1 of No. 147a 

1 of No. 147b 

3 of No. 155 

1 of No. 166 










20 




BH 








This 

writt 



arti 



from M 



Magazine reader Robert Grange was 



We think 



hortly after he had returned from a holiday in Hungary. 




will be of interest to all our read 



particularly 



deringthatatthetime of writing it Robert was only 11 yearsold! 




AST year, I was fortunate enough lo 

spend a holiday on the Continent 

behind the Iron Curtain, and the first 
10 days were spent in Budapest, the 

capital of Hungary. During this time, I 

was able to observe the difference and 

similarities between methods of transport 
there, and at home. 

Personal means of transport are res- 
tricted mainly to bicycles and motor 

cycles — these latter are enjoying a grow- 
ing popularity. Because of the absence 

of privately owned motor cars, public 

transport in the cities of Hungary is in 
greater evidence than towns in Western 
Europe, every town and city having large 
fleets of buses and trams. 

The Budapest trams are rather shabby 

and painted in dull greys and 
They operate like trains, consisting of 
three or four carriages in the rush hour, 
and are jammed full of people, some 

hanging out of the doors! Under these 

conditions it seemed hardly possible for 



greens. 



ihe conductors to collect the fares. 



A 



number of these trams are driven by 



women. 







Ther 

interest 



> are lots of buses, too. Some 
ng ones have concertina middles 
to obtain extra length and seating accom- 
modation without seriously affecting their 
ability to corner. Others are in two parts, 
a front motive part and a rear trailer. 



Lik 



th 



e trams 



the} 



are all 




deckers. Taxis are everywh 



all the 



same model and made in Russi 



_i, but 

they took rather like our own Standard 

Vanguard with a very ugly bonnet and 
rear, and all in 



Roads 



arc 



dull drab 
generally 



very 



poor 



especially in the towns. They are in the 
main, very narrow, and we met some 
terrible surfaces. Many of them are 
cobbled, and one day we actually saw 

cobbles being laid, a very slow and 

tedious job. Often one would get stuck 
behind an old farm cart on a narrow 

road, unable to pass. 

This brings me to farming, which is 

one of the main Hungarian industries: 



there are, therefore, lots of farm vehicles 
We came across little wooden farm cart 



look as if they 



Id collapse with 



ry little weight, let alone th 



c 



loads they carry 




Thev 



pairs of horses, donke\ 



b 



pulled by 

nicest of 



all 



oxen — gl 



chestnut b 



m e n 



ih fa 



xning white ones 
The drivers, usually 

chewed straw 



i 



c 



id 

Id 



a friendly smile and wave as 



by. 

lion 
kno 




There is very little farm mechanis 




ih 



will come later, wh 



Railway engines are very well cared 

for, all the paintwork looking very smart, 
quite different from the trams! The 
brasswork was polished and shone very 

brightly. They are mostly large 4-8-0 
steamers with large black blinkers and 
huge buffers, iheir whistles are very 

strident and shrill. Watching these trains 
come thundering down the track hooting 







away, you could imagine you were back 
in the days of the Wild West! 

The level crossings are just booms, 

some being raised and lowered automati- 
cally, others had to be wound by hand. 
Unlike our own, hardly any of the track 
mileage was fenced off. The goods trains 

usually hauled some 40-50 loaded trucks, 

physically larger than our own, at a good 
speed, and we were held up at level 
crossings so many times that I could not 
possibly count them. The diesels were 
smart and clean, looking very fast, they 
were nearly all green and white, very 
streamlined with the cab some distance 
from the ground. The majority of goods 
were moved by rail, and all through the 
night trains could be heard whistling and 
screeching over the tracks. 

The River Danube is an important 
part of Hungary's transport system, large 
fleets of barges can be seen carrying 

coal and other bulk goods on this great 
river. 

I enjoyed my stay in Hungary very 

much and I hope this letter will give you 

a general impression of the transport 



situation 



in 



this 



interesting country 



behind the Jron Curtain. 





1 Night in Moscow Square— Budapest's busiest 

tram junction 

2 The Vienna—Budapest express with its 'ground 

level' doors 

3 One of the 'Vanguard-tike* taxis and the famous 
chain bridge 

4 A crowded '//cams' bus. Notice the cobbled 

road surface 

5 Commercial activity and barges at Csepet Port 
on the Danube 



21 



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NO. 1 





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by Ian R. Stair 





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This fine model of H.ffl. brig "Fantome" (1839) can be seen In the Science Museum London. 
(Science Museum negative No. 27120) A photograph showing the deck fittings is also available 

from the museum (negative No. 3420) 











•' 



This is the first of a new 






series of drawings and 
articles featuring interest- 
ing seagoing craft of all 
types. The fine drawings 



wi 




build up into a 



and many odd duties performed by His prevent d 



If you make a scenic 



Majesty's small ships fell to the sloops, model, mount it on a fairly calm 
brigs and cutters. Of these the brigs only set the topsails and tope 



h 



ecame increasingly popular and they 



were built in large numbers during the 
eighteen-thirties and forties. 



These brigs were used for scouting and ging has b 



plus the hcadsails and gaft sail. 

The drawings show a typical training 
brig at the turn of the century. The rig- 



'showing the flag' in all parts of the confusion for th 

world- This is now referred to as 'gun- small display model. 



really simplified to avoid 



hing to make a 



boat diplomacy' and many stories could 
be written on the work (hey did in the 
suppression of the slave trade. 



ron of brigs was formed, with vessels of 



wonderful collection and 
they can also be used by 

Ship modellers aS Working different hull form. The results of this 

HrawinriQ Ifvnii liko th<=» experiment could not have been of much 

drawings, it you like tne use to the N HS (he d of lhe 

u a rship we re numbered. 



Compared to most models of this type 
the brig presents few problems, the main 

being the deep bulwarks. I suggest 



During 1844, an experimental squad- the hull be made in four main pieces 



shown in the sections: 

the 



!; 



deck 



a 



nd 



idea, write a postcard to 

the Editor and let him 
know what types you 

would like to see dealt 
with in forthcoming issues 



bulwarks; the fitting of the last 
two to the deck piece must be carefully 
done. This method also enables the deck 
d insides to be finished before assembly. 



In appearance these brigs were similar After the glue is firmly set, the outside 

to the accompanying drawings except that finally rubbed down. The deck fittings 



they would not be fitted with davits and 

boats ii the sides. 



In 1846 the iron brig 'Recruit 



! 



2 



are all q 

main stay is 
bef 



Pi 



b 



make 



the 



urely fixed to the deck 



npilE training brig's chief claim to pos~ 

terity is due to its being the last type 
of sailing ship to be used by the Royaf 



guns was built at Blackwall. London, and 
this had the distinction of being the only 
sailing vessel built of iron for the British 

Navy. 

As the Navy became a fleet of steam 



HI 



fitting the forecastl 



deck 



as it 



be possible 



do 



afterward 



The choice of wood you use depends a 

available, but if you 



lot on the tools 



have a 



coping 



i inch chisel and 



Navy 



Even without this dis-nction. th 



ships, the Iarg 



e 



tog warships d 



heavy model maker's knife, I would 
recommend a close grained wood. 



beauty of the two tall .squa 



gged 



masts rising over the black and white hull 
would endear the type to all ship lovers. 

Brigs were used by the Navy from 



appeared, but a number of the brig 
ried on as training ships and it is in this 
role that they are chiefly remembered 



use 



A 

is 



joinery timber now in common 
Parana Pine: this is not too hard to work 



d it 



kes 



a good finish. Bal 



d 



today 



Their tall masts were a familiar 



fi 



sight in Plymouth Sound and around 
arly in the 18th century, but the first other naval ports until the early years of 



true brig to be built as a warship was th 
'Alert* in 1775, designed by Sir 

Williams. 



Joh 



the present century 

The Model 



In the early 19th century the frigates 
which had been the Navy's jack-of-all- 
trades had become quite large warships to be very alert 



The lofty rigs made the brigs very 
'tender' vessels to handle and the crew had 

in squally weather to 



obechi need too much work in grain 

ing to obtain a really good finish for small 
scale work 

Colours not mentioned on the drawing 
are: inside bulwarks — yellow ochre; guns, 

bitts, gallows, capstan and yards— black. 

Masts, deck and other deck fittings, in- 
cluding gun carriages— natural wood. 
Ship's boats— white with black rubbing 
strakes. 






22 






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23 



Chris Jelley 





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F all the world's motor manufac- 
turers, the British Motor Corpora- 
tion produces one of the widest range of 
vehicles anywhere. Dozens of models 

are in current production, ranging from 

luxury limousines such as the Austin 

Princess, to the huge trucks like the 

Morris 3-tonner, but perhaps the most 

famous type of all is the little B.M.C. 

Mini. The basic Mini design is available 
in several different versions, from the 

standard Mini-car to the Mini Moke, and 

including other examples such as the 

Van, Countryman, Cooper and Pick-up. 

Meccano Limited, in their Dinky Toy 
range, produce models of both the Mini 
Van and the Countryman, but none of 









- 



rii' 




T" I i IB 



g a -h 



drill in the hand brace for 



the latter operation. All that needs to 

be removed with the drill is the 'turned- 
over* end of the spigot that holds the 
base in position at its front end. Do not 



remove the fi 



tied to th 



c 



base 



Once this has been done, take the body 

casting and withdraw the seat and win- 
dow mini t dings, making sure that you 

do not damage them. 

On the roof, there is a small raised 



the others, as yet With a few tools and portion which represents the actual 

a little modelling material, however, it is vehicle's roof ventilator. Immediately Re-DUllding 



remember to leave a "lip* coinciding with 

that running the length of the body. 

Before rebuilding can begin, the two 

holes in the roof, which held the head- 
board, must be filled in, using the cel- 
lulose stopper. Apply this with the 

modelling knife, but make sure that none 

protrudes inside the cab through the 

holes. Allow to dry hard and then smooth 
down with the file or with a piece of fine 

emery paper. 



possible for you to increase your range 

of model Minis yourself by converting 
the standard Dinky A.A. or R.A.C. 

Patrol Van into a Mini Pick-up. For this 

article I used the R.A.C. version. 

The essential tools required are a hack- 
saw or a razor saw, a modelling knife, a 

small file and a hand brace and bit; a 
soldering iron is also useful but not 

essential. Materials needed are a sheet 



in front of this 



tila 



make a cut 



with ihe saw, and extend it 



cally 



Ll 



a 



n wards to the lower indentation 



arking the edge of the side panel 



i. Tf 

you are not using a vice during this part 
of the 

suitable block of wood can be used to 



operation, you will find that a 



hold the 





as shown in 



pic 



A 



Replace the window moulding, then 
add the seats and fit the base, which is 
where the soldering iron would come in 

useful. With the base in position a 'blob' 
of solder on the end of the spigot would 

hold it firmly in place. The cab back 

should now be cut out of the plastic 

sheet. When cutting, incidentally, it is 
only necessary to score the sheet with 



Now cut inwards from the rear along the knife and the section required can be 
of 30 thou, plastic (Plastikard) and a the lower edge of each side panel in turn broken off. Cut out a rectangle, the 



small tin of cellulose stopper, both 
obtainable from most model suppliers. 



until the vertical cut is reached (picture A) 



d 



ram 



th 



section of the body 



inside distance between the sides of the 

model in width, slightly more than the 



Also a plastic solvent and a contact adhe- which is no longer needed. Clean up all distance between the floor of the load 



sive, such as Bostik 1 or Evostik. When 

working on the model with the file or 



edges with the file, using the window 
moulding as a guide. The rear edges of 



platform and top of the cab in height. 
Make two notches in this to accom- 



saw, it is advisable to use a vice, although the cab should be flush with the back of modate the 'lip' on each side, then place 



we have not done so for illustration 
purposes. 

Begin work by first removing the head 

board and then the base of the model. 



the window moulding. Inside the casting 



you wi 



find two raised 



sid 



half-cylind 



m 



hape 



should be filed away {p 




^ each 

These 

. but 



it in position. Mark round the upper 

half of the cab with a pencil, remove the 
plastic sheet and cut to shape, obtaining 

the final perfeci shape with the file. Also 



24 




cut out the rear window, which is shaped 

as shown in picture D, then glue the hack 
in position, using the contact adhesive. 

Although the model already has a 

floor, it is best to add another layer. 

From the plastic sheet cut a second rec- 

langle, large enough to cover the entire 

load platform. Cut out spaces for the 
wheel arches 

plastic solvent, 




First step in turn- 
ing a BMC Mini 

Van into a pick- 
up version. The base 
headboard and window 



and 



seat 



mouldings 




fix in place with the 



having been removed, 

the upper rear section of 
the body casting is cut 



All that now remains to be added is away. If a vice is not 
the tailgate which is rather an unusual available, 



a suitable 

If you look at the back of the block of wood can be 
model, you will see that, instead of a used to hold the casting 



shape. 



single rear bumper, there aro two small 

bumpers which protrude slightly, and 

also the distance between the sides is less 

at the top than at the bottom. To obtain 
the tailgate, therefore, cut out a sheet 

of plastic, the bottom distance between 

the sides in width and with a short 'tail* 

the width of the distance between the 
bumpers. Now taper the sides of the tail- 
gate until it fits snugly between the sides 

of the model and fix in place with both 

contact adhesive and plastic solvent. 



steady 




After 

the 



removing 

upper rear 



section 



of 



the 



using the latter where the tailgate touches body, the edges are 



the floor of the load platform 



cleaned up with the file 



This completes the alteration, but the and the internal half 



model should, of course, be repainted. 

For this, we recommend any of the 
llumhrol range of plastic enamels which 

can be purchased from all dealers in 

handicraft supplies. 

Last word before finishing — I will 
again be describing the new Dinky Toy 

releases next month. 



cylinders removed 



Answers to February Puzzle Paqe 

Quick Quiz 

1. The 2-9 mile long track at Silvarstone. 

2. 'Cello. 

3. 13 triangles. 

4. Chevron. 

5. Holland. 

6. Borzoi. 

Tricky Teasers 

A. Honduras, Portugal,, Scotland, Tasmania, 

Rhodesia, Colombia. 

B. 840 days. 

C. 1, President. 2, Resident 3. Independent 




Before rebuilding, 

the holes in the 
roof for the head- 
board are Tilled in with 

cellulose stopper. When 



dry 



the 



stopper 



is 



smoothed with a file or 
fine emery paper 



4. Prudent. 



5, Impudent. 



6 r Student, 



7. Accident- 8, Evident. 9, Confident. 
Crossword Puzzle No. 12 




A backforthe cab 

is cut out of 30 

thou plastic sheet 
and glued into position 

with contact adhesive 






_L_ 
1 


I E 

O T 


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T £ 


Ir 






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' 



A floor for the 
load platform and 
a tailgate are both 

cut from plastic sheet. 

The floor is fixed in 

position by plastic sol- 
vent and the tailgate by 
both plastic solventand 

contact adhesive 



25 







• 






fsot; 









V * t IB. 



ft ■ - - KB, 





By Doug Mitchell 




You don't need to go to Texas to ride 
the trail or try your hand at roping. 

No 




iree ! You can do it right here in 




ngland. The Flying 



» 




» 



Ranch at 




urley near Ringwood in Hampshire 

can offer pretty nearly everything 
you'd find on a dude ranch in the States 



■ 



\r~\ 




1 Next to his pony, a cowboys saddle is his most prized 

possession. This one is around 60 years old and must have 

seen many long hours on the range. The high cantle is 
there for comfort — almost like a chair back and, if you have 
a fresh bronc, you can jam your knees under the big 'swells' 
in front until he quits bucking. 



2 A saddle is basically in two parts laced together by the 
saddle strings, usually three on each side. They are left 
long deliberately so that they can also be used to tie things 
to the saddle, like this slicker a Flying G guest has decided 
to take on a ride in case of rain. The metal discs through 
which the thongs pass are called conchos* 



3 If you want to stay friends with a cowpoke, don't ask 
htm to lend you his saddle! Every man on the range has 
his own especially made to fit him. Even the stirrup 

leathers — see how tough and strongly they're made — are 

his exact length and don't need buckles. Once they're 
right they're laced up with rawhide thongs and stay that 

way. 



4 Western stirrups aren't small iron things like the 

English -style rider uses, they're big, light, bent wood 

reinforced with metal. Where the leathers loop through the 

top, small straps called hobbles are buckled round to 
stop any chance of the stirrup twisting if you dismount 

fast The broad flaps, called fenders, are attached to the 

leathers and are for leg comfort. 



5 The best cinch (or cincha, to give it its correct name) 
is woven from mohair, like this one. It has an iron ring at 
each end to hold the saddle in place and is pulled up tight 

under your pony's body. For extra strength, this one has 




been made from 18 separate cords knotted in pairs round 
the ring. 



6 Fixed to the saddle is a long, supple leather strap 

called the latigo. Unlike the English-style girth, there is no 

need for buckles- The latigo is passed twice through the 
cincha ring, pulled up tight so that the cincha gaps your 

pony's barrel and, as the picture shows, is fastened by a 
simple hitch. A well fixed latigo never will slip. 



7 

Th 



there's brandina to b 



Double-rig'. In addition to the cincha. a 



hen 



th 



tight with a calf on the end. Here's where 
used for convenience sake. 



26 




Ex -BO AC Captain Leslie Gosling wranglers who accompany each ndc will and boots to fit you. 



started his outfit four years ago with five soon teach you, and not on a lead rein in 



ponies 
be con: 



Since then, riding Western has the paddock as 



in 



most English style 



& so popular that he now runs a 
string of 17 horses and boards 10 guests 
in the bunkhouse. And don't imagine 



schools — beginners go out in ttae forest 
with the rest of the bunch from the start. 
Another advantage about Western style 



The daily routine is usually a two-hour 
ride in the morning and another two 
hours in the afternoon. One day a week, 
usually on Wednesday, there's an all-day 
ride, meeting the chuck wagon some- 



that you'd be 



boy among a host of riding is that you don't need elaborate where for the midday meal. 



the Flying 'G' you get as many 



kit. A pair of jeans, a check shirt and a 



Apart from getting to the Flying *G' 



if not more, boys than girls. If you go 'kerchief round the neck and you're all by car— an easy three hours from 
there on your own, you have to be twelve 



but if you are with an adult the 



set to roam the 92,000 acres of the New 
Forest in real cowboy style — Captain 



age limit. Beginners needn't worry, the Gosling might even be able to find a hat 



London — the ranch will meet guests at 
Brockenhurst Station by arrangement. 
The cost?— £18 a week all-in. 




8 Modem cowpony bits are made from aluminium which 

is light, strong and never rusts. The old type were made of 
iron. It's a severe bit and the long arms to which the reins 
are fixed give enough leverage to hold a really keen bronc. 
At the same time, it needs a light hand not to ruin a well- 
trained horse with a sensitive mouth. 



as large as these need to be used very carefully. A feather 

touch is all most lazy ponies need to make them pick up 

that 



their feet. The jingle reminds your horse 

wearing them I 



you re 



11 Like so many of the words which describe the 

cowboy's equipment, 'quirt' also comes from Spanish 



9 The Western bridle is a very simple arrangement 

holding the bit In place by the aid of, usually, only two 

straps. A short one passes under the pony's jaw while the 
other goes over the head. A single ear loop as here or, 
sometimes, a loop round both ears prevents the head 

strap from slipping forward. The reins consist of iwo 



with lead shot 



has the handle load 

West was W 



quirt was almost as much a weapon as a whip. The 

modern cowboy doesn't find so much use for it I 



separate unjoined straps. 



10 Those high heels aren 



■ 



If you 



have to brace your feet when roping a steer, they stop 
your boots from slipping through the big stirrups. Spurs 



12 You'll most likely see more guns at the Flying G than 
on thB Texas range. Not that cowboys don't have guns 
these days— they just don't carry them as often as they 

used. These hombres are not only pretty quick on the 
draw, they're all members of pistol clubs and first-class 

shots. And those guns are real. 



27 







22 






20 



12 



16' 



• 



■ 












M 



ECCANO models of all kinds are 

attractive to the true Meccano 
enthusiast. While being interested in all 



models, 




even the most enthu 



siastic fan prefers a particular type. Road 



a 21 in. Road "Wheel. This Road Wheel 
must be free to turn on the Bolt. 

Lock-nutted through the end holes in 
the arms of the Cranks is a third 34 in. 



Strip 




at the same time lock-nutting 



vehicles have perhaps the largest follow- a 3 in. Strip 9 in position, as shown. The 



ing or, at least, are the most frequently 

built, but one type of road vehicle which 
docs not often appear in model form is 

the common bus, be it double decker or 
single decker. To Mil the gap, therefore, 



other end of Strip 9 is lock-nutted to a 
Fishplate bolted to an eight-hole Bush 
Wheel, on a 4 in. Rod 10. This Rod is 
mounted in Flanged Plate 2 and in a 
Double Bent Strip bolted to the upper 



here are full building instructions for a side of the Flanged Plate, Collars holding 



reasonably simple single deck bus that 
can be built with Outfit No. 7, plus one 
21 in. Stepped Curved Strip, Part No. 
90a, 



Chassis and steering 

The main chassis members are pro- 



it in place. A 2 in. Pulley mounted on 

the top of the Rod acts as the steering 
wheel. 

Bearings for the rear axle are provided 
by two Flat Trunnions bolted to the 
chassis members. A Sin. Rod 11 is 
mounted in the apex holes of these Flat 



vided by two 121 in. 




e Girders 




Trunnions, 



being 






held in place 



by- 



extended four holes at the front by a 
31 in. by 21 in. Flanged Plate 2 and 

extended three holes at the rear by 

another 3£ in. by 2\ in. Flanged Plate 3. 
A 31 in. by 1 in. Double Angle Strip 4 is 

bolted between Girders 1, 

At the front, the bolt fixing each 
Girder 1 through its end hole, to the 
Flanged Plate also secures a 31 in. Strip 



Collars. Two 21 in. Road Wheels are 
mounted on the Rod as shown. 



Building the body 

As already explained, the two sides of 

the model, while similar in 




a re 



and a 1 in. Reversed 




e Bracket to 



built up using different parts to a certain 

extent. I will deal first with the left-hand 
side. 

A compound 101 in. by 21 in. Flexible 



With SD3nn©r the un d erside of the Flanged Plate. Plate 12, obtained from two 51in. by 

~ I Bolted to the free lugs of these Reversed 21 in. Flexible Plates, is extended down- 

Angle Brackets is another 31 in. Strip 5. wards by a 21 in. by 11 in. Flexible Plate 




A 11 in. Rod 6 is jou mailed in each end 
hole of this Strip and the corresponding 



13, two 21 in. by 21 in. Flexible Plates 

14, a 21 in. by 11 in. Triangular Flexible 



Number Seven outfit will. holes of the previously mentioned Strip, Plate 15 and a 21 in. by 11 in. Plastic 



with only one extra part, enable 



being held in place by a Crank and a Plate 16. The Plates are then edged, as 



Collar 7. Screwed into one tapped bore 



shown, by a compound 81 in. Strip 17, 



youloassemblethisrealisticbus of Collar 7 is a £in. Bolt, which carries built up from two 51 in. Strips, a 51 in. 









28 



Strip 18, a compound 101 in. Strip 19 



also b 
3* in. 



p from two 51 in. Strips, a 



Strip 20, a H in. Strip 21 



-. 



d two 



21 in. Stepped Curved Strips. Three 2i 



Strip 



nd a 24 



Curved Strip 22 are 



bolted to compound strip 19 to repi 



dow frames 



another 5{ in. Strip 



23 is bolted to the f 

pound strip 17. 



end of com 



Attached to Strip 23 are a 21 in. 
in. Flexible Plate and a 24 in. by 11 



In 



3 



Triangular Flexible Plate, both of which 

are extended respectively by two similar 



Plates 24 and 25 



A I 



lidded are a 



o 




Strip 26, a 51 in. by 2j in. Flexible 



Plate 27 and a 2{ 



by 2i 



F 



il 



hie 



Plate 28. which will later be curved 



d to form pai 



f th 



front 



f the 




model. Two 21 in. Stepped Curved Strips 

are used to edge the wheel arch. 

In the case of the right-hand side, a 

section at the forward end is built 

similarly t* » that described in the previews 

paragraph, but,, as there is no door, the 
remainder of the side is filled in by a 
121 in. by 2$ in. Strip Plate extended 
downwards by two 41 in. by 21 in. 



In this underneath view of the Bus the layout of the chassis is clearly shown 



plate is comprised of a 21 in. by 21 in. 
and two 51 in. by 21 in. Flexible Plates. 
A 51 in. by 1* in. Flexible Plate 30 is 
added as also are another two 21 in, by 
21 in. Flexible Plates, curved to shape 
and attached to Curved Strips 22 by 
Angle Brackets, at the same time securing 



by 11 in. Flanged Plate by Spring Clips. 
This Flanged Plate is actually fixed to 

Flanged Plate 2 of the chassis by Angle 

Brackets in such a position as to appear 

in the correct place when the body is 

mounted on the chassis. On the body 

itself, the radiator is surrounded by a 



Flexible Plates, overlapped one hole, and a 41 in. by 21 in. Transparent Plastic 21 in. Stepped Curved Strip 34, t\v.. 11 in. 



a 21 in. by Hin. Plastic Plate. 



The 



Plate, edged by two 21 in. Strips, in 



complete arrangement is edged by suit- 
able Strips as is the left-hand side, and 

21 in. Stepped Curved Strips are again 
used for the wheel arches. Four 21 in. 
Strips and a 21 in. Curved Strip are 

bolted to the top edge of the Strip Plate. 



place 



This Plate serves as the rear 



window and the rest of the back is filled 
in by two 41 in. by 21 in. Flat Plates, 

connected to the sides by Angle Brackets. 

At the forward end of the roof two 
21 in. by 2 in. Triangular Flexible Plates 



Strips and a 21 in. Strip 35. A 5 in. Rod. 

fixed to the body by two right-angled 

Rod and Strip Connectors, acts as the 

front bumper, while two -J in. Washers 
serve as headlamps. 



It is now advisable to fit the 




to 



A 15 in. compound strip, obtained 31 and a 21 in. by 21 in. Curved Plate 32 

from a 121 in. and a 51 in. Strip can now 



be bolted to the top of Strips 22, 23 and 
26, etc., at each side, but the roof must 

be added at the same time. The roof 



are fixed in position. Plates 27 and 28 
can now be curved round and joined, at 
the same time adding a 51 in. by 21 in. 
Transparent Plastic Plate, edged by two 



the chassis, which is done by bolting 
Flanged Plate 3 to the lower Flat Plate 

at the back of the body, and by bolting 

Flanged Plate 2 to Flexible Plates 28 



at th 



f 



front- 



Double Angle Strip 4 is 



is built up from two shaped 12 in. by 21 in. Strips 33 to form the windscreen. 
21 in. compound plates, joined by a The radiator-grill is represented by three 



1?.'in. SLrip Plate 29. Each compound 



31 in. Rods held in the flanges of a 21 in. 



steering mechanism 







connected to the body sides by two 

Double Brack els 36. bolted one to each 

lug. Left-hand Angle Girder 1 is con- 
nected to the rear door pillar by a 21 in. 

by U in. Double Angle Strip 37. Bolted 

between this Double Angle Strip and the 

corresponding Double Bracket, fixed to 
Double Angle Strip 4, is a Semi-circular 
Plate that serves as a 'door-step'. 

Finally, a seat is provided by a 21 in. 
by H in. Flexible Plate attached by 
Angle Brackets to a 31 in. by 21 in. 
Flanged Plate 38. This, in turn, is bolted 

to the right-hand side of the body. 



Parts Required 



3 of No. 1 
10 of No. 2 

6 of No. 3 

1 oi No. 4 
14 of No. 5 

4 of No. 6a 

2 of No. 8 

1 of No. 10 

2 of No. 11 

12 of No. 12 
1 of No. 15 

1 of No. 15b 

3 of No. 16 

2 of No. 18a 

1 of No. 20a 

7 of No. 35 



135 of No. 37a 2 of No. 126a 

125 of No. 37b 4 of No. 187 

14 of No. 38 6 of No. 188 

2 of No. 38d 4 of No. 189 
1 of No. 45 2 of No. 191 
1 of No. 48a 6 of No. 192 

1 of No. 48b 1 of No. 193c 

1 of No. 51 1ofNo. 193e 

3 of No. 53 2 of No. 194 

2 of No. 53a 2 of No. 197 
6 of No. 59 1 of No. 200 
2 of No. 62 1 of No. 214 
2 of No. 90 4 of No. 221 
8 of No. 90a 2 of No. 222 
2 of No. 111 1 of No. 223 
2 of No. 125 



29 




Count-Down Snag 

Ask someone to try to count from 

10 to 5 backwards in ten seconds. 
Chances are, he'll fail. Try it yourself. 

Then see comment below. There's a 
catch to it, of course. 

Remember to stress time limit when 
pulling this stunt on your friends. 



Trick is a Pushover 

Try this at an outdoor party: Divide 

guests into teams. Pair up members 

of teams according to size. Rivals 
stand facing each other with toes 
touching. Palms of both hands also 

touch at the sides at chest level. At 



the word 'q 



ppc 



P 



each 



th 



hand 



one is forced to 



step back. Play 



wh 



force th 



r 



backward 



of 



a>Aii yiM uejs isnuu no A 



the winners, and new matches 



Tricky Teasers 

A. Here is something fresh in problems. 



JSM 



beg 



Just study the following three columns 
of figures: 



1 



1 



1 



3 3 3 

5 5 5 

7 7 7 

9 9 9 

Now, can you cross out nine of the 

figures so that the total of the remain- 
ing figures amount to 1,111. 



B. If there are 25 stations on a railway 

line, how many different tickets are 
required to connect every station with 
every other station? If you can work 
this out quickly you deserve to be top 

of the form. 



Ask a friend to stand with his back to tl 

wall and with his heels against the wa 
Put a penny on the floor about two feet 



front of him 



d 



him that if he can 




em ??J h ° ^tj^ ™r ng his Crossword Pu 



heels from the wall, he may keep 

Dont' worry, you will not lose your penny 

And here is another one for you to try. 





No. 13 



Draw a line 



the floor with a pi 



of 



chalk and then try this: 

Keep your toes on the line, kneel down and 

get up again, keeping your arms folded all 

the time. 

It sounds easy — but just try it for yourself ! 



Why is a watch like a river? 

Because it will not run long without 

winding. 




Across 

1 A human spanner 

10 To point 

11 To trim off 

12 Measurement of time 

13 Pinnacle 

16 Floored by this? 

17 Italian for yes 

13 Seaside resort 

21 Agreement 

24 Son of Pope Alexander VI 

25 A holy person 

26 Middle portion 

27 It's dynamite 

29 Sharp stone 

30 Struggling 

32 Not you 

34 Boy's name 

35 Car club 

36 It's sometimes addled 

37 Seen on the stage 

39 Also 

40 Animal 

42 Produced by trees 

43 You need this for 
journeys into some 

countries 

44 Absentee 

45 A signal 



7 said I'd make you proud of me, Dad\' 



Down 

1 Winged mammal 

2 Part of de Janeiro 

3 Sprite 

4 Spanish for the 

5 A sail pole 

8 Not down, this one 
a 7 Harmful 

8 One who thinks too 
much of himself 

9 Encore 



i M 


3 






IO 




m 


... 


13 


r^ 


V 7 


■^7 




• 


Fi "" ■ 










21 27 | 


25 






25 








MB* 7 I 


30 




i f 


1 







a 



m 



14 Useful to drop this 

sometimes 

15 Watch out when you 
hear a dog doing this I 

17 Guard 

19 Naval rank 

20 It's corny 

21 Like 



22 Past sitting 

23 To make a musical 

sound 
26 To rise suddenly 
29 Blemishes 

31 Turn over, please I 

32 Intended 

33 For example 



34 To fire 

35 Mounlains 

37 Quickly 

33 Liquid 

39 American airline 

41 A good listener 

43 A good mark on 

homework 



• 



■ 















30 






first 






make tracks with 






adventure shoe that 



perfect 



school 






The approved shoe for Scouts and Cubs! 
(Guaranteed for 6 months) 




- 1 








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~p 



-■ . — t ■ 



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yj 



tv. 




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* j 



i j b ■ 





L ' 



.*J 




t" 1 





■ ■ 



rb"» t *r^-^ x «'» 



*-*^ 



■_A. 



* '*J 



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JtJA ■ 









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The only shoe that teaches you 
how to recognise animal tracks! 

There's a secret compass in the heel of this shoe! 




Perspiration-proof linings 



Soft leather uppers 





Foam-cushioned hee 




Soles sealed to 

uppers are waterproof 



All junior/senior sizes, black/tan. from 35/1 1 d. 



FREE! A Road Sign Guide with every pair ! 



i 



Obtainable from all good shoe retailers. 
In case of difficulty write to 
Wayfinders, 151 Oxford St., London, W.1 

for the address of nearest Wayfinders stockist 

NAME,,, 



L u - 



'* "■* *■* LVV"»H "' ' •M|ll< IttlltUII 



-Bit tlllMllnlUlllM 



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Be the first to make tracks with 




11 









new No. 

P.V.A, Seccotine for most plastic or 



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waterproof and heatproof. 



oil-proof 







Standard Seccotine— indispensable 
every handyman for over seventy years. 

Its sheer adhesive power is known every- 
where. 



TILL ONLY 






Sole Manufacturers: 

McCaw Stevenson & Orr Ltd. Belfast 




31 







Distinguished visitor at the 
lane Scalextric circuit at the 
Schoolboys and Girls exhi- 
bition, was Rediffusion Tele- 
vision star Patrick Wymark. 
Following his success as John 
Wilder in The Plane Makers, he 
is currently to be seen in The 

with 
power on this track, Patrick 

enjoyed himself enormously 



; 




: 



L ■ b 

■"«■■ i Vr* 
■_■_■»_■_■ 




Power Game. Playing 



• 



and to judge by the expressions 
on the faces of the two budding 

Jim (Wymark) Clarks under 
tuition— so did they! 

During the week, Clive Swain 
of West Drayton, Stephen 
Mitchell of Ealing and Peter 
ruce of Pinkney's Green put 







.. 



Til 









■ r 



' - 








M 



OST 



Scalextric enthusiasts, 



in 




their eagerness to get the race 



such a *De Luxe' racer that's so dis- 
tinctive. 

SILVER: front and rear badges; 

windscreen frame; windscreen wipers; 
door handles ; body side trim ; top 



up the fastest track times. They fine detail moulded into every car 



under way, seldom stop to examine the edges of doors: hood cover studs; 

-** ■ ■ A m* a A m 



rear light surrounds. 



are to be the guests of the body. Production difficulties and cost RED: rear lights. 



Daily Mail at the British Grand 
Prix at Brands Hatch. 



prevent the manufacturers from pick- BLACK: seat back 



ing out all this detail in correct colour 

hut there's nothing to stop you from 

doing the job yourself. As an example 

we took a light blue Mercedes 190 SL 
and went to work with a No. 00 sable 



• 



hood 



instru- 



brush and a couple of tins of plastic chrome.) 



ment dashboard ; steering wheel disc 
centre ; wheel centres. (Paint the whole 
of each wheel centre, then carefully 
wipe off the surface to reveal the 
Mercedes three-pointed 



star 



in 



enamel ; the results are shown in this 



TAN: steering wheel surround and 



photograph. There's certainly a lot of cross bar. 

satisfaction to be had from driving BROWN: driver's gloves. 






12 



* 




















Here 



are some more pictures from 



the Scalextric factory. 




This is where 




all 



starts 



This 




handful of plastic granules will short 

be transformed into a racing car 
body in one of the enormous mould 
ing machines that were shown in the 

January issue. 




Every car is assembled 



by 



hand 



and then individually tested. 




Here's the end of a long line of 

being joined by the start of a 




Vanwall production line. 




Tyres 



by 



the 



thousand are here 



seen 
they 



* 



being 



fitted 



to 



their wheels; 




soon be rolling round tracks 



all over the world. 








- * 



33 





Much added enjoyment can 

be derived from your model 

railway if you operate it in 
true 'full size' fashion. MIKE 
RICKETT helps you to do 

this with this description of 
the workings of the Tri-ang 
Hornby Bell Code Set. 




section a 



section b 





n 



^ 






section a 



section b 



section c 



M 



ODEL 



railway operation 



IS 



a 



subject that many enthusiasts find 



of communication between signalmen on 
B.R., and it is used to prevent more than 



of great interest— indeed many of you one train entering a section at any one 



will already have derived added enjoy- 
ment from running trains in a similar 
way to B.R,, rather than just running 
them round and round — something that 

can become boring after a while. It is 

by operating trains properly, that model 
railways can become a really fascinating 

hobby, especially if the methods used 

on the real railways are followed as 

closely as possible. Many of the methods 

used by B.R. lend themselves admirably 
to the average model railway layout, and 

can often be successfully used. The time- 
table described in the January 1965 issue 

of 'Meccano Magazine* is but one 
example, and many of you have since 

devised a timetable similar to this and 

subsequently found it of great value in 
adding interest to the layout. 

Our attention this month is not on 



timetables, however 



but 



IS 



instead 



focused on equipment that I recently 

noticed in the Tri-ang Hornby range, and 

which those of you interested in time- 



table operation 



will 



find 



extremely 



useful. It can, as with a timetable, be 

used in a similar manner to the real 
thing, and would add that extra touch of 

authenticity to a model railway. This is, 

of course, the Tri-ang Hornby Bell Code 
Set-RT 268, which costs 47s. 6d. 



time, and also for indicating the type of 



tram entering 



a 



section : functions. 



incidentally, that can be served by the 
Tri-ang Hornby Set. The use of the bell 

code and block instruments gives the 

operator control, by the use of signals 

and points, over any train about to travel 

in his block section. 
The power input on the two block 

instruments is located at the back of the 

unit, where there are two sockets marked 

B and R. The additional six sockets at 
the back of each unit should be used 

lor wiring the two units to each other by 

connecting socket 1 on unit A to socket 



1 on unit B, and so on to socket 6, by 



using the multiple flex that is supplied 
with the set. If great distances are 

involved, six lengths of normal bell wire 

can be used, stapled to the intervening 
baseboards. It would also be wiser, 

m 

under these circumstances, to provide 

each instrument with its own power. 

The block instruments are suitable for 
almost every type of model railway 
where two or more operators are likely 
to control trains, but there are certain 

types of layouts where the set becomes 

particularly useful. This is an end-to- 
end layout design which many enthusiasts 

are now using, and which is particularly 



This set is a reproduction in miniature, suited to the bell code and timetabl 



e 



of the block instruments used on B.R., 



operation. It will be necessary, where 



and which are supplied to nearly every three stations are involved, to install one 



signal box. The set consists of two block 

instruments and sufficient wire to connect 






the two i instruments to each other, and to 
a power source of 12/15 volts. 
The bell code is an important means 



block instrument at each end, with two 
at every intermediate station. The instru- 
ments are always connected up in pairs, 

to allow communication to take 
between adjacent stations, as shown in 





This is what you get when you buy 



B 




Code Set, ft makes the operation of your system a real 'two-m 



'job 



■^ 







O^i 









.*_■ 



»x" 



■ J 



I ■ 






U*_" 




'I'm 



■-'. 



^" 



. x . 









tl L ■■ 

1 »■ 



lOj 



.*_■ 






■. 



1 -I 














t 



I-\ 



t m 



r* 



». 







34 






' 



Wjring-up fs a simple matter 
of inserting the ready-made 
plug connections into the 

appropriate sockets in the 
back of each block 

instrument 





the sketch accompanying this article. The 

above does not, however, exclude the 
bell code from use on continuous layouts, 
although in some instances, difficulties 
can arise, e.g., those involving a reverse 

loop, if divided into two sections. 

Before installing the block instruments, 
the entire layout should be divided up 




mancntly in position, and also lo prevent 



damage occurring 



by 



them 



being 



tion B. He will tap 3 pause 1 pause 1 

his block instrument, which means, in 



dropped. Where two instruments at any 
one point are required, this arrangement 

will also be found to be more convenient, 

for the operator can then communicate, 

without moving, with other operators. 
The operating procedure is very similar 



Ife 



is your section 



for 



t 



of this type?' If section B is able to 

to accept such a train, he would clear 



th 



approp 



liIs and points and 



into sections or "block sections", as they t0 l hat used on B.R., and it is first of all 

are known on B.R. On an end-to-end necessary to acquaint yourself with the 

layout this would be quite simple and a bell code. I would suggest that copies 
section would extend half-way to the 



then repeat the signal on his key to A, 
also setting the switch on his instrument 
to the 'line clear' position, which will be 

repeated on the indicator of the instru- 



adjacent stations, or if the length of run 
is very long, and includes a feature such 
as a goods yard, three sections, one half- 
way from station A to the goods yard B, 
and another half-way from there to 
station C. The goods yard operator B 
would, therefore, have two block instru- 
ments at his command, one for com- 
municating with station A and the other 

for station C. Where a fairly large oval 
with a station on either side is concerned, 
it would be advisable to create two sec- 



of either the full code, or the simplified 

version be made for each control paneL 

An operator in section A wishing to 
pass a train to section B would first 
indicate that his signal box is open by 
tapping 5 pause 5 pause 5 (signal box 
open) on his instrument key. He will 
[hen tap 1 on his instrument, calling 

section B to attention. The latter will 

then acknowledge by repeating one tap 
on his instrument, leaving A free to 



ment i 

cleared 



section A. After section A has 

signals and points on his 
he will now be able to pass the 




forward, and he rings 2 (t 



ledged 



) on his key, which is acknow 




section B 



he 



Iso alt 



his 



switch to 'train on 

repeated by the ind 



vhich will be 

in section A. 



indicate the type of train. 



This 



may 






appear unimportant, but on the more 
important railway lines, the type of train 



tions, as shown in our drawing. A layout 

involving a reverse loop might be difficult would dictate the particular track that simply not acknowledge the signal sent 



When the train has reached section B he 

signals 2 pause 1 (train out of section) to 

A, and resets his switch to normal, which 
is once again repeated by the indicator 
on the section A instrument. 

Should operator B have been unable 
to accept the train from A, he would 



if the entire loop is not controlled from 

the nearest station and formed into one 

block section. 



they would run on — up fast, up slow, 

goods loop, etc., and if your layout is a 
large one, the chances are that you might 



I would suggest a simple shelf, built have the equivalent of these tracks. 



alongside the control panel, so that the 
block instruments can be mounted per- 



Let us suppose, therefore, that section 
A wishes to pass an express freight to 



by A and would have left his switch, and 
therefore the indicator A. at 'Normal* 

(line blocked). II more than two stations 

are included, operator B would then offer 

the train to C, and the same procedure 

would be followed. 



I 



Comprehensive Bell Codes 




Opening signal 

Call attention 

Express passenger train 



5-5-5 

1 
4 



Electric express passenger train 4-2 

Local electric passenger train 3-1-2 Branch freight train 

u— ft* rit «- H _ _ 



Through freight or ballast 

train 
Stopping freight- mineral or 

ballast train 



1-4 



3 
1-2 



press 



3-1 -1 

3-1 

1-3 



Local passenger train 

Branch passenger train 
Empty coaching stock 

(main line) _ _ . »„„,,, *.«*.«* -*>.., *. v * 

Electricernptycoachingstock 2-2-1 2 than two brake vans 

*-* _ hB ■ _ - _ *_ _ _ _ 



2-2-1 



Special freight stopping in 

section 

Breakdown train 

Light engine 

Lighl engine with not more 



2-2-3 
2-2 

2-3 



1-1-3 



Empty coaching stock (branch) 1-2-2 Mineral or empty wagon train 4-1 

ft^* #4 l - L J I ftt -■- -ft- _ _ 



Express unfitted 
Perishable freight 



3-2 

1 



Train 



Cancelling 

Danger obstruction 
Close signal box 




I 



entering section 



Train out of section 



2 

2-1 



1-2-1 
3-3-5 





Train approaching 

Line clear 

Train at a stand 

Train divided 

Engine arrived 

Shunt train to allow another 

to pass 
Train clear of section 

Working in wrong direction 2-3-3 



2-1-3 



1-5-5 




2-5 

6 

7-5-5 




Simplified Bell Codes 



Opening signal box 
Call attention 

Express passenger train 

Local passenger train 

Express freight 

Stopping goods train 

Empty coaching stock 

Light engine 

Mineral or empty wagon 

train 
Train entering section 
Train out of section 

Obstruction danger 
Closing signal box 



5-5-5 

1 
4 

3-1 
3-1-1 
3 
2-2-1 




4-1 

2 

2-1 

6 

7-5-5 



35 








O turn Meccano Magazine's own 
Swing Bridge from a highly realistic 
but, nonetheless static model, into a 
working piece of layout equipment, it 



must be motorised, and must also be 
fitted with a reduction-ratio gear box 

and an electrical contact which will allow 

it to turn through exactly 90 degrees and 

no more. When building the original 
bridge, Mike Rickett used a Meccano 

Emebo Electric Motor as the power 
plant, and Meccano standard and Elektri- 



kit parts for 
system respec 
illustrated on 

follows: 




gear box and electrical 

The complete unit, 

page, is built as 



Five 1\ in, by 2\ in. Double Angle 

Strips 1 are bolted to a 5\ in. by 2\ in. 

Flanged Plate, one at each comer and the 

fifth mid-way between the Double Angle 
Strips which appear at the back in the 

first illustration. All the Double Angle 

Strips are then connected at the top by 

two 5i in. Strips 2 and two 2\ in. Strips, 
at the same time bolting four Double 
Brackets 3 in position at the corners. 




The completed mechanism showing the correct position for the Commutator and wiper arm. Note that the 

Bush Wheel (74) on the bridge pivot is mounted in the opposite way (inverted) on the bridge 



pleted unit to the underside of the base- 
board, incidentally, are provided by 
Double Brackets 3. 

The wiring that is necessary in the 
mechanism is quite simple, and involves 
Joumalled in front Strip 2 and the only three wires. The first is connected 
Flanged Plate are two ? in. Rods 4 and 5, from the control panel to one terminal of 



SOLDER 

WIRE HERE 



and a 4 in. Rod 6, Collars holding these 

Rods in place. Mounted on Rod 4 is 

a } in. Pinion 7 in constant mesh with a 
57-teeth Gear Wheel 8 fixed on Rod 5. 



the Motor, the second is soldered to the 

arm of the Elektrikit Commutator with 

the insulation gap running opposite it 
and the third has one end soldered to the 




REMOVE COPPER SURFACE 
BETWEEN DOTTED LINES 



' i 



J 






COPPER 

SURFACE 



■ 



Also fixed on Rod 5 is another i in. wiper arm positioned to the right of the 



Pinion 9 and a lj in. Wiper Arm 10 
which rests against a Collar. In addition 

the Wiper Arm is held by Nuts on a i in. 

Bolt 11, being spaced from Strip 2 by 
four of the Nuts. 

Pinion 9 meshes with a 3| in. Gear 
Wheel 12 on Rod 6, which also carries a 

modified Commutator 13 and an 8-hoIe 
Bush Wheel 14. The Commutator is 



Commutator, and the other terminal of 

the Motor. The two wires that emerge 
from the mechanism are connected up to 

the control panel which will be described 

next month. 



A drawing showing the portions of the 

Commutator surface that should be removed 



Tightening the Nuts holding the mechanism in place under the' bridge base 



modified 




cutting and removing gaps 



in the copper contact area ONLY with 

a sharp modelling knife, in the two posi- 
tions indicated on the accompanying plan. 

Note that Bush Wheel 14 should already 

be fixed to the bridge at this stage, as 



described 



by 



Mike Rickett 



tn 



his 



February article. It has only been 

included in the above photograph to show 
that the pivot for the bridge is provided 

by Rod 6. You will have realised, there- 
fore, that this Rod is the one which 
protrudes through the appropriate hole 

in the baseboard. 

Before the Motor can be fitted, the 
5i in. by 2$ in. Flanged Plate must be 
extended by a 2£ in. by H in. Flanged 

Plate 15. An Emebo Motor is then 

bolted in position as shown, a Worm on 
its output shaft engaging with Pinion 7. 

The anchoring points for fixing the com- 



Parts 
required 

2 of No. 2 

2 of No. 5 
4 of No. 11 

1 of No. 15b 

2 of No. 16b 

1 of No. 24 

2 of No. 26 

1 of No, 27a 



1 of No, 27b 
1 of No. 32 

20 of No. 37a 

8 of No. 37b 

5 of No. 48a 
1 of No. 51 
1 of No. 52 
7 of No. 59 



1 of No. 111 
6 of No. 111c 
1 of No. 532 
1 of No. 551 

1 Emebo 

Electric Motor 








36 





This interesting little group of vehicles just 

breathes the atmosphere of the race track. 

The colourful little Mini-Cooper with its 
wickerwork finish,, black body and red 

roof comes from the Corgi stable and costs 4/11. 

Right behind it, the Racing Transporter and the 

B.R.M. car are recent Lesney 'Matchbox' models. 

The Transporter has a transparent roof and an 

elevating top deck with folding access ramp. Just 
emerging from It the dark blue B.R.M. is a beauti- 
fully detailed model with intricately reproduced 
suspension and engine — all plated. Th© Transporter 



costs 7/6 and the B.R.M. 2/ 




■ 























Nice gift fof any modeller is the new 
Swann Morton 'Unitoot'. This company 
has always enjoyed a good reputation for 
the quality of its products and this latest 

one continues the tradition. Both balsa and plastic 

kit enthusiasts will find the three bladed tool very 
convenient to use, and any of the blades can be 

selected for use and locked securely in position very 
quickly. The two unused blades are safely locked 

away within the substantial brass handle. Complete 
in smart plastic wallet, the 'Unitool" costs 6/- 






j 




The 'works' and the control box of the Tamiya T'34 tank 







Don't miss the Revell 10th Anniversary 
catalogue. It's choc-full of beautiful fu 

colour pictures of the entire Revell line. 

Price 1 /-. 

The Corgi Toys 1966 catalogue, reveals a 

surprisingly diverse range of vehicles and 

accessories with every one illustrated in 

colour. Price 3d. 

The Humbrol set of 'Monster Colours' 

Ghoulish hues for those weirdie kits. The 

price of this set {incorrectly quoted in an 

earlier issue) is 6/9, 

The long-awaited Revell Focke-Wulf 



Condor. A four engined beauty 



in 



pale 



blue plastic — now available, price 12/6, 




Pictured on the right Is the new 
Frog 'Black Widow*. The article 
on page 18 shows you how to 
convert this 1J72 scale 6 shilling 
beauty tntoaNorthrop'RepQrter', 









The item that really caught everyone's 

attention at the Meccano Magazine Stand 

at the Schoolboys and Girls Exhibition was 

undoubtedly the remote controlled Tamiya 
T-34 ?ank- This impressive 1/35th scale model 

rumbled around our stand every day of the two week 

exhibition, burning out several motors in the process, 
but coming through the gruelling test with flying 
colours. Working off two 3V batteries enclosed in 

the hand-held control box, the tank will travel both 

forward and in reverse, turn left end right or turn in 
its own length by reversing one of the tracks. It will 

climb almost any gradient you confront it with too I 

The Tamiya T-34 is a most realistic model and is 

really simple to put together. The two gearboxes 

with which it is equipped come completely finished 

ready to bolt in place and one motor drives each box. 

The kit for this model is not yet obtainable in this 

country but will eventually become available 
through B.M.W, Models, 329 Haydons Road. 
Wimbledon, S.W.19. Price is not yet known, but 
will be in the region of 30/- complete. As wa go to 
press, two of the larger tanks, operating on the same 

principle as the T-34. are in stock at B.M.W. They 

are the M-4 'Sherman', and the M-40 'Big Shot", 

each at £3/17/6. 




James Bond does everything larger than 

life, so it is onfy fitting that the demand for 
the Corgi model of his famous Aston 
Martin should follow suit Since its 
introduction, thousands of boys have been dis- 
appointed in trying to find a shop with one for sale 

and the manufacturers have been working night and 

day to try to meet the unprecedented demand. Just 
about everything on the model works I There are 
retractable machine guns, telescopic overriders, 
pop- up rear bulletproof screen r opening roof and 

ejector seat that really does eject the unwanted 

passenger, and the special box opens to reveal a 

sealed wallet of 'secret instructions'. Price of this 
Corgi winner is 9/11. 



STOP PRESS! 

This car won the first Toy of the Year 

award and the prize for the Best Boy's 

Toy at this Year's British Toy Fair. 



37 




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I rt 



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. i .11 ir 1 1 . ■ i 



250 



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m-mm 



>* 



RUB-ON LETTERS 



STRIPES 



Give your models a professional finish and save hours 
work by using Blick Modellers' Dry Print. 

Just rub over and the characters appear — it's as easy as that 

Letters and Numbers in Black, White and Gold 1/- per packet 

Rub-on Stripes in Red, White and Gold 2/- per packet 

See your local model shop for this exciting new product an> 

look out for additions to the ranae. 



BLICK OFFICE EQUIPMENT LTD 

(Dry Print Division) 83 Copers Cope Road Beckenham Kent 



FOR PERMANENT RESULTS . . 

MODEL 



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With the fa 



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d air 



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there is no need to 'wait on the weather* for shooting 

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The perfect complement to all Webley air weap 



Webley target h 
splash aprons 
prevent damag 



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will 
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with widi 

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securely. They are available in th 

xr. 6V x6±"x 1". or 4i" x 4" x 1 



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THE JUNIOR or PREMIER 



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MARK III AIR RIFLE — there's a weapon for all, eac 
ideal for indoor or outdoor shooting. 

Illustrated Webley catalogue of air rifles, air pistols and 



for postage to 



t on request. Please enclose 4d. stamp 







37/E/F PARK LANE, BIRMINGHAM, 21 



Regd. Trade Mark. 



Send 



self-hardening 
sample 



material 



and booklet 



sole Manufacturers 



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Harbutt's Plasticine Ltd., Bathamptoo, Bath, 

Somerset. 






9 










Get tough double quick. Morley Lightning- 
quick Ju-Jitsu Course shows how. Make any 



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ess in a flash with your bare 



hands. Easy to learn; quick Jap combat tricks, 
and all knock-out blows. Fear no-one. Full 48- 
lesson course only 7/6 post paid. 

Develop Powerful Arms Course 3/6, Powerful 
Chest 3/6, Powerful Abdomen 3/6, Powerful 
Legs Course 3/6, The 4 Courses 12/6, Tricks 
of Self-Defcnce 5/-, How to Conquer Nervous 
Fears 3/6, How to Develop a Perfect Voice 3/6, Ju-Jiisu Com- 
plete 22/6, Boxing for Boys 3/-, Secrets of Karate (details free) 
25/-, Fori ones from Formulas, 10,000 Trade Secrets, 30/- 
(details free) 25/-, ProfKable Slamp Dealing at Home 8/10, 
Money from Typing at Home (35 ways) 6/10. 

J. J. MORLEY, 28 (M.M.8) Dean Road, London, N.W.2. 

3,000 Self-Help and "How 1 ' Roaks-^List fret. 



38 






















DINKY 



TOY WINNERS 




ELOW 



Silhouette 



were the first correct answers to be selected by the 
Editor. If your name appears in this list, then write on 
a postcard to : Silhouette Prize, Meccano Magazine. 
Thomas Skinner & Co. Ltd., St Alphage House, 

Fore Street, London. E.C.2. and claim your FREE 
Dinky Model Ford Capri. If your name does 



R. Harse, Blackborough Road, Reigate, Surrey. 
Robert Hawtrea, Chatsworth Road, Hayes, Middx. 
D. Hedges. Meadow Way, Gt. Bookham, Surrey. 
P. Hooper. West Ave., South Shields, Co. Durham. 
M. Hulse, Severn View Drive, Eardington, Bridg- 
north, Salop. D. A Kellet, Argyll Mansions. 



s.w 



B 



Brightons, Falkirk, Stirlingshire. Scotland. Martin 

Leach, Baizdon Road, Blackheath. S.E.3. P. Leverkus, 

Well Street Thetford, Norfolk. J. Lhyd, Allimore 

not appear in this list even though you entered for Close, Welwyn Garden City, Herts. J. Lovell. 



Answers to this months puzzles 

Quick Quiz 

1. United States of America 

2. Hexagon 

3. Their eyes being made very wide. to[catch every 
ray of light, they can see at* nights food which 

other birds miss. 

4. Rutland 

5. Arc de Triomphe, Part's 

6. Victoria Cross 

Tricky Teasers 



the competition, don't be too disappointed— try 
again I 

D. Baker. Clitherow Ave., Hanwell, London, N.7. 
A Ball. 21 Clandeboye Place, Bangor, Co. Down, 



N. Ireland. C 



Stainbeck 



Balmoral Road. Longwell Green, Nr. Bristol. 7. 

Irving. Boston Ave., Benton Lodge Estate. Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, 7. C. Jackson. Plaistow Ave., Hodge 
Hill, Birmingham, 34. H. J. Mayson, Middletonn 

Ave.. Ickley, Yorks. S. Muicahy, Ken net Close, 



A. 



1 1 



3 a 



7 7 . 



1, 1 1 1 



Yorks. 



Berry, Walsh 



Upminster, 




M. Neave, Highgate Road, 



B. 600 different tickets 



Edmunds, Suffolk. Master D. Bowen. 24 Church - 
fields Road, Salisbury, Wilts. 7". Brook. Hamilton 
Terrace, London, N.W.8. C. Bushell, Countess Road, 
Amesbury, Wilts. D. R. Clark, Carlton Road. 
Walton -on-Thames, Surrey. A. Collier, Paget Street, 
Grangetown, Cardiff. R. Cooper, Holake Road, 
Mapperley, Nottingham. D. Cotteriil. Balfour Road. 

Preston, Lanes. K. Curtis, Springfield Ave., Holbury, 

Southampton. A Davis. Budshead Road, Whitleigh, 
Plymouth. Devon. M Delandy, Park Way, Nassing- 
ton, Peterborough. A Egner, Victoria Terrace, 

Jarrow, Co. Durham. /. Gibson, Byron Ave., 

Coulsdon, Surrey. A Goodwin, Henley Wood Road. 
Earley, Reading, Berks. 5. Grundy, Waithwaite 
Chapel -Stile, Ambleside, Westmorland. P. Gummow, 
North Field Drive, Parview, Truro, Cornwall. P, 
Harratt, 39 Kynance Gardens, Stanmore, Middx. 



Kentish Town, London, N.W.5. Master R. Oliver, 
Elms Drive, Chelmsford, Essex. £ Perrott, The 
Westra, Dinas Powis, Glam. J. Perry, Hillside Ave., 

Kingswood. Bristol. A Raby r Newbold Ave., 

Chesterfield. H. Robinson, Rookhope Post Office, 
Bp. Auckland, Co. Durham. A Rudd. Lilac Grove, 
tby, EHesmere Port, Cheshire. A G. Smith, 

Taller Foad, Quarn. Nr. Loughborough, Leics. J. 

Smith, Broom House, Breetton Lane, West Bretton, 
Nr. Wakefield. R. Wilson. Medway Cres., Gateshead, 
Co. Durham. £ J. Worboys, Whin Knoll, Ave., 

Keighley, Yorks. England. 






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Overseas Winners of Competition H 

J. C. Bourgeois, 161 Avenue Louis Plana, 31 
Toulouse, France. R. Theison, Rue Michehal foch 
Virton. Chorince le Lusen Bourg, Belgium. 



'M 






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39 



and NO RUBBISH 



turriDs cat a 




BA 1 R ? ci N D,SCOUNT APPROVALS which off«r a wide ranj« of modern Br. Colonials only or Whole World in lirif les and s«u 

uded. SEND TO-DAY for a large trial selection. No "free rift" but we always pay outward postaze. No obligation to buy. 



CO, 104, LIVERPOOL ROAD, SOUTHPORT. LAHCS 



STOCK CLEARANCE PARCEL 



appro 



500 MIXEI7 STAMPS, mostly large British 

Empire and f oreigrt pictorials from 
vals books, Auction Lots. Collection 

10/6, plus 6d. postage. 

WORLDWIDE STAMP SALES 

(Dept. Ml), 

DISS. NORFOLK. 



100 Different British Colonials, free to approval 

applicants sending 6d. post age /packing. Only 
500 packets available, so rush your request ! 
M. FISHER (MB). 88 Mount Park Rd„ Eutcote, 

Pinner, Middx. 



TOKIO 

ATHLETICS 



OLYMPICS. 

GOLD MEDAL 



30 FREEI 

LONG 



TRIANGLE 
SWIMMING 



. „ . JUMP, 

& 27 other stamps free! Send 4d. post, request 
appvls. Dept. M, 51 Grosvenor Rd.. Epsom, Surrey. 



10 



HUNGARIAN (Transp.) FREE to 

everyone ordering one of th 



PACKETS 



10 dirt. 

Formosa 

Liberia 

Sudan 

Zanzibar 

25 dilf. 

Columbia 

Europe 

Lebanon 

Malta 
Monaco 

Paraguay 

San Marino 

Siam 
Triangulars 

Venezuela 



50 dilL 

l/tf|Argcntina 
1/9 Brasil 

Canada 

Bolivia 



100 dilf. 



1/9 

3/3 



1/9 

2/6 

2/- 
3/9 

3/3 

16 



Egypt 

Iceland 

Israel 

Luxemburg 

Manchuria 

Mexico 

Pakistan 

Nicaragua 

l/9|p cr sia 

3/6 Portug, Col, 
4/-' Turkey 



t/3 1 Austria 

1/9 Bulgaria 

l/6j Chile 
2/6 China 

Finland 



2/6 

11/- 

7/- 

2/9 



Germany 

India 

N. ZInd 
Malaya 

Peru 



3/3 Kussia 
10/- Salvador 
2/6 Sweden 



Sfc 



Spain 
Poland 



W- 

a- 

10/- 

10/- 

10/- 
7/6 

17/6 
4/6 

3/- 
4/6 



Postage 4d. extra. 

BATTS TAMPS 



Please tell your parents. 

C.W.O. UST FREE. 



(Hi, 16. Kidderminster Road, 
Croydon, Surrey. 



2/6, 




GREAT BRITAIN 



10/- (cat. 6/3) 





This packet of stamps is given absolutely FREE to 
all genuine applicants for my superior used British 
Colonial ApprovaJs enclosing 4d. in stamps for 

postage. Overseas Applications Invited. 

D. L, ARCHER (M), 

2 LITCHFIELD WAY, BROXBOURNE, HERTS 










British Colonial Approvals, sent on 14 dayt 

approval. Single Country Books if preferred. 

Satisfaction and personal service guaranteed. 

Ashford, 31 A Disraeli Road. Putney, London, S.W.I 5 



CIGARETTE CARDS— Illustrated Cat. 2/9. 
25 Cards 1/-, 250 Cards (Sets & Part Sets) 6/9 

500 13/-. 1,000 25/-. 

Q.E.II. Stamp Cat. Well Illustrated 6/9 

T. H. SMITH. Wick Farm, Lueport, Somerset- 



FREEI! 

100 STAMPS (all different) 

To all collectors who 




Request our Baroain Discount 
Approvals. 

• Enclose 4d Postage. 

-KAY STAMPS 

Holtspur Top Lane, Beaconafield, Burks. 




-■ STAMP 

QUIZ 

Do ft?u Know:- r^\ 

1. WhlC country puts V— / 

•C.C.C.P.' on it* stamps! 

2. Does ICELAND issue stamps? 

3. Name any country which hu 
issued TRIANGULAR scamps?... 

4. What country issues special 
CHRISTMAS stamps* , 

Prizeai — W* will send you a i pedal 

prize packet of 50 choice stamp* free 

for each question you answer 
correctly. 200 stamps free (cata- 
logued over 35/-) plus the famous 
Black Swan, for 4 correct answer*. 
We will also imq you our Famous 

New approval*. Please tell your 
parents, 

UNIVERSAL STAMP CO. 

(Dept. MM J) 

Eastri riff ton. Gnnli. Ynrkt. 




Keep your 



The 213 are ALL 
DIFFERENT and 

include H Special Stamps 

(catalogued at over 10/-) such as the 
ao-year-old British "Penny Lilac" and 1876 
Ottoman Empire, &c. Whole collection is 

catalogued at over 45/-„ yet it will be sent 

FREE to all who ask to see our New 
Approvals, (No need to buy any!) Please 
tell your parents. Just send 6d postage t 

PHILATELIC SERVICES 

(Dept. M.M.2) 

EASTRINGT0N, G00LE, YORKS. 



good condition 

Special Binders are available 
Price 

Send postal order to: 

Meccano Magazine 
St. Afphage House, Fore 






London, E.C.2 



m\ 



. 


















Observer's Book of 

SCULPTURE 



absorbing 



much 



Observer's Book 

DOGS 

The ideal reference book for 

revised 



awaited newtitle by William I dog-lovers 

Gaunt. Tracing the fascina- Sonia Lampson. Describing 



art 



which 



Sculpture from 



over 



breed 



from 



we 



can 



study 



civilisations of the past. 



plates including 
showing reproductions 
many famous masterpieces 



more popular breeds to the 

rarer breeds hitherto known 

colour I only to the specialist. Giving 



a clear concise description of 



each 



with 



Biographical notes on sculp- I origin, habit 



tors; glossary. 



6s net 



graph. 



notes on 

photo- 
6s net 



Write now 



free 



illustrated leaflet 



to: 



FREDERICK WARNE 

1-4 Bedford Court 
London WC2 



40 










by F. E. Meicalfe 




,<**»+* 




•a 




Down Under 

As these lines appear in print, 
collectors will be getting their 



first gl 



the new stamp 



which were issued February 14 
10 coincide with the change, by 

Australia, from pounds, shill- 



littie group of stamps to take 
up, if you are looking for new 
philatelic fields well worth con- 
quering. More about that later 

on in these notes. 



G. B. Issues 



uigs 

cent 



d pence 
Other 



.loll 



d 



I 



have 



more 



ds are, of referred 



to 



our 



than 
own 



once 

new 



making the ch 



stamps 



d 



to their grow 



In previous notes I mentioned ing importance with collectors 



this matter 

better go in 



d now I had I make no apology in mention- 



more details, for ing them 



In fact 1 will 



as can be seen, collecto 



ill probably go on writing about 



be taking these new stamps them fr 




• I 



me to 



h 



very 



seriously, due to the fast is the position they are taking 
ing interest in Australian amongst home and Common- 



issues. There is not room to 



ealth collectors. When, last 



describe the designs of so many year, the P.M.G, announced 

stamps, but here are the values 
Australia : 1 c. 2 c. 3 c. 4 c. 



the 



nips 



ch were to he 



5 



6 a 7 c. 8 c. 9 c. 10 c. 13 c. 1 



issued, many thought that it 
was all just a flash in the pan. 



20 c. 24 c. 25 c. 30 c. 40 



50 



Now it can be 



h 



75 



S 



52, $4. Incidentally, ^at whoever happens to get 



the 3 c and 4 c stamps are alst 
repeated in coil form and 

whilst the two values 



the job as head of our Post 



Office, we 



likely to get new 



in sheets stamp 



ry mon 



or two 



are recess printed, in coils they a nd as can be seen already. 

are rapidly becoming quit* 

stamp conscious nation. In f 
I wc 



so not 



are photog 

should you go in for both 
far as the coils stamp 




a 



uld say that those now 



d, but you need these in collecting modern G.B. stamp 



pa 



1- 



they h 



wh 



(particularly the issues of the 



known as the varied perfora- present 



reign] 



have 




tion, to enable them to be used doubled in numt 



during the 



machine. Nauru : I c. 4 



past 12 



in 



7c, 8 



10 



30 



Norfolk Is 



1 



2 



50 

3 



SI 
4t 



No 



5( 

5fl 



ID 



15 



20 



25 



30 



h 



$1 (overprints). Papua ordinary defi 



v let us suppose that you 

decided to collect Great 

Q.E. II issues. Of the 



issue, there 



and New Guinea: 1 c. 3c. 4 



5 



10 



15 c, 20 



25 



50 



are three watermarks, and also 

variations in watermark posi- 



$1, $2. As recently as last year tions f inverted sidewa) 



both British Solomon Is 



d which you should go in for 



Gilbert and EI lice Is. brought The Commonweal I h and Eliza 



out new sets (that for G. and beth 



talogues 



E. was very attractive) in the details. The defin 



give 



full 



should 



now obs 



Australian cur- be taken 



rency (£l = 16s. sterling). These stamps 
two territories will also have 

le course. But 



p at once, as new 

soon to be released, 

and stamps with watermark 
erted or sideways (which the 



new stamps in cl 

in the meantime their current two catalogues wi 
stamps will be surcharged in whilst readily obtainabl 



plain) 

as I 



the 

that 



the 



dollars and cents. Now write, at reasonable prices, wi 



rrency kick-off as cost a lot more money as time 



far as the postage stamps are goes on. You 



also have 



concerned. Later, though not lot of fun and perhaps profit, 
this year, Fiji Is., New Zealand looking for the varieties, which 






and Dependencies, will follow may exist on th 



The Post Office Tower issue 
and some of the depen 



Post Office. I don't mean just 

those rarities which get men- 
tioned in the papers, and which 
bring hundreds of pounds in 

auction, but the more modest 

items. The catalogues will tell 
you all about them, and the 

Commonwealth at 12s. 6d. and 

Elizabethan at 15s., could prove 

good investments. Most dealers 



will be able to supply. 



And 



then there are the special issues. 



These generally 



have 



some 



interesting varieties, the most 

outstanding of which get cata- 
logued in the two works in 

question, and my word you can 



have 



some 



fu 



n searc 




for 



them. Summing up G.B., if 

you feel you would like to have 
a go, do not waste a minute, 
for the obsoletes are going up 
all the time, and ever more 

rapidly. 




The Tip of the Month 

I have already written aboui 

the prospects for G.B. stamps, 
and how popular they are 
becoming. But there are not 

enough of them to keep an 

active collector cracking. So 

why not have a shot at the new 

Australasian issues referred to 
above. Most of these stamps 



are printed by the Australian 



State Printary, and it is perhaps 

because they have been doing 

such fine work this last year or 

two (this is the reason why they 
are almost my first favourites, 

also with the issues of South 
Africa, a country which never 

exploits collectors, as do so 
many others) and producing 

such interesting, and attractive 

stamps, that their popularity 
has simply shot up, and their 

philatelic sky looks like being 
the limit. Australia and Depen- 
dencies should be proud of 

their stamps, and I warmly 

recommend them as issues well 

worth your attention. And if 

you buy whilst they are current, 
they should prove quite a nice 

little investment. Not that that 
should be your sole aim. There 



suit, so there you h 



a fine buy in the normal way at the the text 



stamps you denctes issues mentioned in is more to stamp collecting than 



a cash gain. 



41 







42 



to find out more about the many interesting products 

vertised in the pages of Meccano Magazine. Just tick the 

squares against the name of the advertiser from whom 

you would like to receive more product information and 
post it to:- 



Your Coupon 



March I Friend's Coupon No. 



March I Friend's Coupon No. 2. 



March 



D Adana Li Mcccano(Cliki) 

C Ashford Meccano (Dinky 

L Archer Toys) 

*Beck lJ Meccano 

U Birkdale i j Morley 

U Blick I Mink 

Q Batlslamps [1 Newnes 

Bcatties J Odhams 

[ H.M S C onv .... Pcco 

Concord Electronics Q Playcraft (Railways) 

□ Fisher Q Rcarden Smith 

□ Gee Kay Q Roseberry Stamps 
D Granta Canoes O Scalextric 

H.A.C Q Stamp Club 

Humbrol D Scccotine 

D Hinton D T- H. Smith 

G Hammant & Q Solarbo 

Morgan □ Railway Modeller 

_ Harhulis Q Warnc 

Q Alan Hales i Wayfinder Shoes 

r Johnsons of Hendon "I Wcblcy & Scott 

r KeilKran Q Worldwide Stamps 
D King Charles 

To: Meccano Magazine, St. Alphage House, Fore 
Street, London, E.C2. 

NAME .. . .... 

ADDRESS... . .... 



u 



Adana 
Ashford 
Archer 
Beck 

Birkdale 

Blick 

Battstamps 

Beat tics 
H.M.S. Conway 

Concord Electronics 

I ishcr 
Gee Kay 

Granta Canoes 

H.A.C. 

Humbrol 

Hinton 

Hammant & 

Morgan 

Harbuus 
Alan Hales 

Johnsons of Hendon 

KeilKraft 

King Charfes 



Meccano it liki i 

Meccano (Dinky 
Meccano 

Morlcy 

M i n ic 

Newnes 

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Roseberry Stamps 

Sea lex trie 

Stamp Club 

otinc 
J\ H. Smith 

Solarbo 

Railway Modeller 

Warnc 

Wayfinder Shoes 
Webley & Scott 

Worldwide Stamps 






Adana 
Ashford 

Archer 
Beck 

Birkdale 

Blick 

Battstamps 

Hearties 

H, M.S. Conway 
Concord Electronics 
Fisher 

Cice Kay 

Grama Canoes 

H.A.C. 

Humbrol 

Hinton 

Hammant & 

Morgan 

Harbutts 

Alan Hales 
Johnsons of Hendon 

KeilKraft 
King Charles 



Meccano (C 
Meccano (D 
Toys) 

Meccano 



Newn 
Odhams 

Peco 

Playcraft (Railways] 

Rcarden Smith 

Roseberry Stamps 
Scalextric 
Stamp Club 

Scccotine 

T. H. Smith 
Solarbo 

Railway Modeller 

Warne 

Wayfinder Shoes 

Webley St Scotl 

World wirlrv Si.imm 



To: Meccano Magazine, St. Alphage House, Fore I To: Meccano Magazine, St. Alphage House, Fore 
Street, London, E.C.2. | Street, London, E.C.2. 



NAME 
ADDRESS 



NAME 



iii i 



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■ 



ADDRESS 



i 



subscribe 



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name 

address ..,., 

+ ■* III ■#♦■• I IV l*t III llf 141 III ** + ••• !•■• III *f # III III I It III # + • »#+ III I II *■ m *«• ■•* ■ *. 

Ptease post this coupon with your remittance for one 

year to meccano magazine circulation department* St. 

Alphage House, Fore Street, London E-C.2 



r«Qinra ffurtkar words dI 



conttnue on inothar ih*«i of o»p*r 






43 



:; 



a r 

■ ■ 

■ ■ 

s: 



• ■ 




': 










[ 






mm 









: 







Dealers 



who 



sp 




eci 



alise 




in 



Meccano 




■■ 






ar 






:: 



Listed below ore some of the dealers who self Meccano accessories and spare parts. 

This is intended to aid enthusiasts — and there ore many of them — who constantly 
require additional spare pans for their Sets. AH dealers can t of course, order Meccano 
spare parts for their customers, but those listed here are among our spare part 

specialists. 



C. G. MARSHALL 

Maxwell Road 

BEACONSFIELD 

Telephone: 4092 



TETT'S THE IRONMONGERS 

402 Wimborne Road 

Winton, BOURNEMOUTH 

Telephone: Winton 309 



H. SALANSON & CO. LTD. 
83-85 Fairfax Street 
BRISTOL 1 

Telephone: 2-618S 



BARRETTS LTD. 

2 St. George's Street 
CANTERBURY 

Telephone: 66161 




R. M. HILL & SONS 

36/40 Castle Street 
CARLISLE 

Telephone: 21621 and 21122 




DOLL'S HOSPITAL (YOUNGSTERS) 
55 Hallgate 

DONCASTER 

Telephone: 2831 






o a a 



O o o 




H. A- BLUNT & SONS LTD. 

133 The Broadway, Mill Kill 

LONDON N.W.7 

Telephone: Mill Hill 2877 



JEREMY 

16 Princes Arcade, Piccadilly 
LONDON, S.W.I 

Telephone: Regent 1846 



LANE'S TOY SHOP 

75 High Street 

ROCHESTER 

Telephone: Chatham 41870 



WILTONS SPORTS AND GAMES 
Corner Canal and Queen Street 
SALISBURY 

Telephone: 2984 



JOHN W. BAGNALL LTD 

18 Salter Street 
STAFFORD 

Telephone: 3420 




LESLIE BROWN 

Super Toy and Model Store 

95 High Street, Stockton-on-Tees 

Telephone: 67616 




OVERSEAS DEALERS 

AUSTRALIA 



Jack Stanbridge's Hobby Shop 

54a Canning Highway 

Victoria Park, PERTH, W. Aust 

Telephone: 61-1668 






NEW ZEALAND 




44 



Educational 












Prc- 



Dinkittb list from 

75 Paris XV11° 



und post-war 

IJujardin, 134 lid. Hcrcire, 

» Obsolete Lorries, Dinky 

for list. K.. Wilson, Fieldview, 

Clacton-on-Sea. 



Jacques 
I-rancc. 



and 



Supertoy. S.a.e. 
Weclcy Heath, 



• Commonwealth Stamps for sale in bulk, i lb. 

10s.. i lb. 18s., 1 lb. 35/-- Also a superb strip 
of three, £5. British Consular stamps from Con- 
stantinople, dated 1S94. Stamps of Great Britain 
15s. lb. Any offers. C. Clarke, 5 Tweedy Kd., 

Liromley. Kenl, 



* Large Tri-ang layout consisting of four engines. 

four 



six coaches, 12 rolling stock. 

Straights, 15 curves, buildings, 

baseboard. For HO. £15, £10 
Grable, 52 Wood Lane, Sonning 

Reading, lierks. 






points, 

modern station, 

S.a.e. R. A. 

Common, 



Large Minic Harbour. Many ships, accessories. 

Send s.a.e. lor details. Hird, 20 Gkndak- Ave., 

Whitley Bay, Northumberland. 



• M.M.'s, 1930-1936 and 1942-1965, Complete, 

some bound. 1.10. Howlett, Old Farm House, 
Tubncy. Abingdon. 



Meccano Set: Good condition, present 
over £32, for sale at 20 gns. or offers. 

Detailed inventory from: Hammerstone, 13 Alba 
Gardens. London, N-W.1L 



Large 

value 



M.MA. 1959-1963 



dition, 30/-. 



(5 missing). 
Also "Look and Learn 



excellent 

\ 86 



con 



(4 missing), most good condition, 30/-. 

Moss Collage, Fowlmerc, Cambridge. 



copies 

Stewart, 



WANTS 

o Old Meccano, original 

scries, 149, 172. 177, 178; 
exchange. Also required. 
Dc Stefano, Vtale Trustee 



electrical parts. 300 
have 33, 104, 129 for 

two lhl t V, one 167C. 
ere 101, Rome, Italy. 



o Pre-war 



i »r\» 



0" 



locomotives, electric or 



gauge 

clockwork, single items or complete layouts. 
Price and condition pk ^ . Dwroure, 27 Great 
ern R.J., Hockley, Essex. 




Set Ten Meccano. Condition and price 

Tucker, 4 Herschcll Rd. t London. S.E.23- 



to 






* Over 14 and interested in buses in East Midlands 

area? Then why not join the |pcal society? Send 
for full details to: 93 Main St., Swithland, Lough- 
borough. Leics, 



• Obsolete Dinky Toys, etc. Highest prices single 

or collections. D. Pinnock. 6 Stream Farm Close, 
Lower Bourne. Famham, Surrey. 



• Pre-war Dinky Trains and Toots tery cars 
Gilmour,, 16 Great Lawn, Ongar. Essex. 



• Pre-war trains and other toys or relevant data 
sought by enthusiast. Butler-Edwards, 1 Chesham 
Crescent, London, S.E.20. 



• Number 8/9 Meccano, Good condition, com- 
plete. Details: Kerry. The Chestnuts, Walsham- 
le-Willows, Suffolk. 



• Chemistry set; can afford £2. Farnham, East 
Horndon Hall, Brentwood. Essex. 









Cardiff Education Committee 




Stamps 

SERIOUS COLLECTORS SHOULD SEND 
FOR SELECTION OF FIRST-CLASS APPROVALS 

STATING CHIEF INTERESTS 
H, B. LANG. 3 Brooklyn Avenue 

South Norwood, London, S.E.25 



REARDON SMITH NAUTICAL 
COLLEGE, FAIRWATER, CARDIFF 

Principal: 
Capt. J. N, Rose, R.D., I.P.. M.I.N,, Master Mariner 



PRE-SEA TRAINING 



Canoes 




BUILD YOUR 

OWN 



CANOE 

with the new Laminited/PVC covering 

Full-size Plans and Instructions 10s. vd. 

£14 14s. Od. 
fi9 10s. 0d. 



Complete Kit of Parts from 

or Ready Built Canoes from 

Catalogue FREE from 

GRANTA CANOES ■ COTTENHAM 






This Residential College provides courses 
as follows: 

A one- year course of Phase I towards 

Ordinary National Diploma 
Nautical Science— with Phases II & 111 

after the young man goes to sea. Four 

passes at 'O" Level required including 

Mathematics, English and Physics or 

some comparable subject 

A one-year course for those not eligible 
for (a). Passes in Mathematics and 

English at least are very desirable but 



CAMBRIDGE 



not essential; 



opportunity exists 

the College, 



take these subjects 

provided a candidate's ability is such 

necessary 



Radio 



that he can reach 
Standard. 

Each course leads 

Remission of Sea Service. 



NINE months 



Fees 



residence and tuition £180. 



Hear 



Continents 



WITH H.A.C. SHORT-WAVE RECEIVERS 

Noted for over 25 years for . . . 

S.W. Receivers of Quality 

Improved 1966 Models now available . . . 
provide even more startling results, 

Orifr-Valva Model "CX" Price 34/6 

Two-Valve Model "E 11 Price 52/6 



Grants are available from Local Edu- 
cation Authorities and certain other 

channels. 

Prospectus and further information 

may be obtained from the Principal 

(address as above). 



Robert 



PrcsswooU, Director 



Education, City Hall. Cardiff. 



All kits complete with all components. 

accessories and full instructions. Before 
ordering call and inspect a demonstration 
receiver, or send stamped addressed 

envelope for descriptive catalogue, 

"H.A.C." SH0RT-WAYE PRODUCTS 

(Dept. M.M.), 44, Old Bond St., London, W.1 



Chemical Spares 



•V 




Science Apparatus 



THE WIDEST RANGE OF 

CHEMISTRY APPARATUS 

and CHEMICALS 





CHEMISTRY 
APPARATUS 



IS AVAILABLE TO CALLERS 

OR BY POST FROM:- 



Endless interest ! Build your laboratory with 

spare apparatus and chemicals always avail- 
able. Write for price list enclosing 3d. 

stamped addressed envelope. 

LOTT'S BRICKS LTD. Dept.lVICS Watford Herts 



A. 




* 






60 STOKE NEWINGTON HIGH ST 



Canoes 



LONDON N,16 



CLI 0335 



P.B.K. CANOES 



LIST FREE 



Plans, Materials. Accessories. Canoes Built 

to order 
6. G. HINTON (6). Milton St.. Fairford. Glos. S.A.E 



MAKES D/FFERENTRADIGS 

Amazing Radio Construction Seti Become 
ft radio expert for 35/-. A complete Home 

Radio Course. No experience needed. Full 

Instructions, Step-by-Step plan, all Tran- 

>iscors, loudspeaker, personal phone, knobs, 

rews, ccc. f • )! you need (parts avail, sep,). 
Originally £6. NOW 35 - plus 3/6 p. & a. 



amazing CIGARETTE RADIO 



rr» 



18/6 



Yes, ft perfectly ordinary picket of cigar- 
ettes! — taut ic fetches in station 
after station, loud and clearl 
Holds 10 cigs. — yet cleverly conceals highly 
sensitive, fully transistorised circuit (rncl. 

patt.)* Simple assembly, No soldering. 
No experience necessary. Only 16 Conn 
ALL PARTS for iB?6 plus 2 6 p. & p. 






f- 






h - ■ 



tions. 






CONCORD ELECTRONICS LTD.. (Dept. mm u 77 NEW BOND ST., LONDON, W.1 



j ' * 



^ .. tl i 



Anyone can build in 2-3 hours! 

Only 19/6, Even the older children 

build them! * ♦ . no soldering— only 

1 6 connections! Then hear it reach out 

bringing in station after station loud 

and clear. 4j w x2i" Xli". Many Testimonials; 

W. H. of Bradford writes: I am amazed how cosy 

it h to build to a layman iifce me. 19/6 plus 2/6 p, & p. 

Parts available separately. 



45 






Then try just one FLEISCH MANN 



loco — prices from 



any 



will 



run 



on 



58/11 
rail 



track 



negotiate 



any 



rail 



point 



and 



will give a power and smoothness 



control that will 



amaze 



you 



/ 965/66 CATALOGUE 2/9 inc. post 



KING CHARLES SPORTS CENTRE 

MODEL RAILWAY SPECIALISTS 

RAILWAY HOUSE 
KING CHARLES STREET, LEEDS 

Tel. 2661 1 





DEVELOP AND PRINT YOUR 



OWN FILMS 




TH 




JOHNSON 



DO-IT-YOURSELF KIT 

These easy-to-use kits come complete with chemi 

accessories, instructions and the "Home Photography" 

book. Slocked by good photo dealers. From 37/6 to 1 12/6. 













Si 




11 



MERCHANT NAVY CADET SCHOOL 




* Magnificently situated on the 
Anglesey shore of the Menai 

Strait, CONWAY prepares cadet* 

for the G.C.E. examinations at 
O and A levels so as to qualify 
for leading British shipping com- 
panies or the Royal Navy. 

* Cadets on entry are enrolled 

Cadets R.N.R. 



months* 
for 



service 




remission in sea 

the second mate's 
Lion (15 months if two A 

passes in G-C.E. arc obtained). 



level 



* A 

and 



fleet of 26 pulling, sailing 

motor boats is available for 




* Entry is between 13 J and 143 
for the three-year course; 14 j 
and 16 for the two-year course 
(16$ if already holding five 

G.C.E. passes at "O" level). 



technical training. 

* The CONWAY course is 

fH-imarily designed to fit boys 
or ultimate command in the 



Merchant Navy* 



* Successful 




of a 



CON WAY course earns up to 12 



* Fees: £390 p.a. Reductions 
for sons of full members of the 
Mercantile Marine Service Asso- 
ciation and the Merchant Navy & 

Airline Officers' Association. 



Send for illustrated prospectus to; The CONWAY Cadet School, 

II Nautilus House, 6 Kumford Place Liverpool, 3. 






Adds up to PROFITABLE PLEASURE ! 



The New 
ADAKA 




in U.K. 



FREE 



If you are looking for 

really absorbing, instruc- 
tive hobby and have the 

ambition to earn EXTRA 

CASH then start to get 
ahead NOW— by PRINT- 
ING at home with an 
AD AN A I Your customers 

are all around you, waiting 

for the type of printing jobs the AD ANA 

can produce. The potentialities are 

limited only by the scope of your 

ambition. Adana machines are world* 
famous. They are real printing 

machines using standard printers' type 

and turning out first-class work. 

Send now for J REE details to: 



A sample of real printeri* 
type, as used in ADANA 

Machines for all who 

write for details. 





(Dept. MM30) 

15/19 Church Street, Twickenham, Middlesex 

London Branch: 8 Grays Inn Rd., W.C.I. 




MARCH issue 

includes the following 
features: — 

N gauge line built by boys 
In and out the paint shop. 

Special Toy Fair report. 

Plus of course, all the 
regular popular features. 

Don't miss it. 

It's the magazine for all 
railway modellers! 



1 




monthly 



March on safe 
25th. Feb. 



PECO PUBLICATIONS LTD 



SEATON 



DEVON 



46 




Click 



click 



click 



and 



your 



models are made. Cliki builds towns 



and 




villages 



with 



homes, 



shops, 



garages. And they're all so realistic, 
thanks to Cliki's special details. 




CLIKI sets from 







6 Add-on sets at only 2/6 each 






%■**'*. 










baseplates that lock together with special locking points 
cannot fall apart 



roofs that have tiles and look windows that open and shut doors that are hinged lo open 



just like real roofs 



and close 









neat little bay windows with chimneys. TV aerials and many with eve/yset ihereare wheels, 



flowers in a bowl 



more finishing touches 



axles and special holed blocks 

for making pushalongs 









CLIKI & CLIKI 



at your toyshop 




Another MECCANO Product 



47 






r 




48 




Now start adding that extra track and have all 
the excitement of watching your Scalextric 

Set grow into that dreamed-of super layout. 

Over 30 different exciting track sections to 
choose from. 











Bring life to your Circuit by adding to 



i 




from 



the 



fabulous Scalextric 




ange 



of 



over 50 different trackside buildings, figures 



and kits. 





Scalextric Cars will keep you in front 






GO 



WITH SCALEXTRIC to 



all 



race 



meetings. 

Grand Prix Cars 

Competition Cars 

Sports Cars 

Grand Touring Cars 

Vintage Cars 

Motor Cycle Combinations 
Go-Karts 










PRICE 

29/6 



MARTIN G. 




Green) 




The ever increasing Scalextric range of 
super Cars, Track and Accessories will 

bring fantastic realism and super excite- 
ment when added to your circuit. Keep in 
touch with your dealer to see all the latest 

additions. 






THE WORLD'S MOST COMPLETE 
MODEL MOTOR RACING SYSTEM 







Ml 







HAVANT 




































MECCANO LTD . BINNS ROAD . LIVERPOOL 



You get terrific fun with new-look M 



the fun of making 



thing 



that 



t 



excavators 



Every new-look M 



Jiy work! Giant build 

tipping trucks. 



cranes 



* d i 



trac 



m ■ 



set contains engineering ma 



giving you details and illustrations of dozensof real-to-life thing 



you can desig 




build lots 



mo 



to make. And, of course, 

yourself. 

These are the fabulous sets you can choose from: — 

WORK BOX SETS from 14/11 — Playset; Junior Set; Super Junior, and THEME SETS from 
£2.2.0. — No 3 Highway Vehicles; No. 4 Airport Service; No. 5 Site Engineering; No. 6 
Ocean Terminal; No. 7 Mountain Engineer; No 8 Breakdown Crew; No. 9 Master Engineer. 
















RALLY CAR 

Rugged! Sturdy! Another beauty 

from Britain and Dinkyllhe 
Dinky Hillman Imp has all these 

exciting action features; Monte 
suckers, number on each door. 

opening bonnet, opening boot 

with detailed rear engine, 

jewelled headlights, extra spots 

on front bumper, prestomatic 

steering and detailed interior. 

Model No. 214 



Length 32" 



Price 




II 








PHANTOM 

Superb! Luxurious! The Phantom V with 

chauffeurand 2 passengers . Hasa wonderful 
collection of action features . AH four doors 

open . Boot lifts . 'Gull wing' bonnet opens 

to reveal detailed engine . Jewelled twin 
headlights and spot and indicator lights 
'Chromed' radiator 
and bumpers. 

Model No. 152 



Length 5t\ 



Price 







ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW FROM 




PRECISION DIE-CAST SCALE MODELS 




I'uWMictl hv Thomas Skinner & Co. (PuMMturs) Lid.. Si. Alphuge House Fore Si.. London, E.C.2. Printed by Jamci Cond Ltd., Charlotte St.. Birmingham J 








G2 



HULL DECK LINE 



PENNANT MAST 



l/ 8 BALSA 
PLANKING 




■ * 



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1/16 SHEET CABIN ROOF 






Gl 










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HULL DECK LINE 



COLOUR L /NE 




f /e* 'fie 5 TRIP 



m * 



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* * 



SIDE 



PAINT 
BLACK 



PAINT 
BLACK 



CEL L ULOID 




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WINDS CREEN 














HARDWOOD 






IflSSQ. BALSA WINDSCREEN 



FRAME 



CO VER Wf TH 
CEL L ULOID SHEET 





i> 



i' 







PHASE 3 meccano magazine March '66 

Thomas Skinner 4 Co. (Publishers) Ltd. 




X f //<5 HARDWOOD RAIL 



1/8 SO. BAL SA 



RE MO VE DECKING BACK TO HERE 




CI 



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PENNANT MAST 



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PL Y FRA ME 



WITH 
CELLULOID SHEET 





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REMO VE DECKING BACK 






SCOOP CARVED 
FROM 3//$ SHEET 




COVER WITH 
CELLULOID SHEET 







meccano magazine March 

© Thomas Skinner <£ Co. (Publishers) Ltd. 






R/ 



CABIN ROOF 
II4SHEET 



GRAB HAN 












I/4SQ. S TRIP 



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HULL DECK LINE 




JfaSHEEr 




CABIN TOP 
8t/2XSt/£ X { 



GRAB RAIL 
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WINDSHIELD 



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